Audience Questions

Audience QuestionsHour 1

Hour 1 Hour 2 Hour 3
Watch Dennis from California Comments

Dennis bought some new computer memory from Amazon. It proved to be defective. So he returned it and only got partial credit. Amazon says that he used store credit and as such, he didn't pay the full price. Shouldn't he get that credit back? Leo says absollutely. Sadly, that's Amazon's policy and you have to beware of it. But Dennis should also be wary about what you buy from Amazon because over half of it isn't from Amazon, even if fullfilled by Amazon. It could be defective because it's counterfeit.

Watch Justin from Manitoba, CAN Comments

Justin bought a small HP laptop with 32 GB of storage. But he cannot update Windows on it. Options? Leo says the PC is so desperate to get a low price point, they're making products that are basically useless. Leo says if Justin feels comfortable with Linux, there are flavors that are designed to run in small, constrained and older laptops. Puppy Linux is one. He can also install an open-source Office suite like Libre Office

Watch Scott from San Diego, CA Comments

Scott is trying to submit pictures for the latest Tech Guy photo assignment, but it's not being processed. What can he do? Leo says that SmugMug has been re-engineering Flickr since it bought it. So they may have logged Scott out. Log in, and then try and resubmit. He can also clear the browser cache.

Audience QuestionsHour 2

Hour 1 Hour 2 Hour 3
Watch Father Neil from Jordan, Minnesota Comments

Father Neil wants to make his Catholic Masses available to his older partitioners at home, but he's been told it'll cost at least $2500-5000 a week to do. Leo says that's nonsense. All he really needs is a camera, a tripod and a microphone, and a computer. The Focusrite Scarlet will allow him to plug audio from the church mixing board to the computer. He can then stream it through YouTube Live or Facebook. But he can also use a smartphone.  Get everyone to subscribe to the YouTube channel, and once he gets over 1000 subscribers, he can stream from a mobile phone.

Watch Dale from Los Angeles, CA Comments

Dale is getting notifications from Google on his laptop. Leo says that those are ads triggered by some software that Dale is using. Leo says it could be a browser hijack that's causing it. He can go into browser settings and turn off notifications from sites he visits. In Chrome, it's turn off browser notifications. He may have to do a little digging in the menu settings. He should also check Browser Extensions. Here's how - https://support.google.com/chrome/answer/3220216?co=GENIE.Platform%3DDesktop&hl=en

Lastly, Leo recommends using Firefox. They are very aggressive towards protecting privacy.

Watch Jerry from Pennsylvania Comments

Jerry likes to watch YouTube on his TV, but his TV browser isn't going to be supported anymore. Leo says don't use that browser. It's terrible. Look for a YouTube app available for the smart TV and install it. Better yet, connect a Roku Box, Apple TV, Amazon FireTV or even Google Chromecast and use their interface. They will also be updated regularly. Will Samsung spy on users like they do on a TV? Leo says no. And most malware isn't targeting TV sets. Leo also advises getting a Chromebook for those "sketch sites" and a Chromecast. Then he can cast to the TV securely. QUBS is another option.

Audience QuestionsHour 3

Hour 1 Hour 2 Hour 3
Watch Jim from Los Angeles, CA Comments

Jim has a Motorola car kit for Bluetooth, but his iPhone 8 won't pair to it. Leo says general Bluetooth software may have been updated beyond what the car can support. The two products are probably incompatible, unfortunately.

Watch Frank from Durango, CO Comments

Dick is thinking about getting YouTube TV. Good buy? Leo says it's the best way to go for cutting the cable and streaming online. It comes with all the local channels. Is there a DVR that supports it? Leo says it has a DVR built into it for up to six people. The only thing it doesn't do is skip commercials. Dick is also a pastor who wants to stream his church services. The ATEM Mini from Blackmagic offers up to four HDMI inputs for streaming different cameras. It's under $500. 

Watch Joseph from Riverside, CA Comments

Joseph needs a good laptop for browsing, email, and syncing to his phone. Leo says that he's recommending Chromebooks now. They are the most secure because they work with just the Chrome browser. Data is stored in the cloud. Samsung makes a great one. The only hiccup is the photo browser. But Leo recommends using Google Photos on the phone and let it back it up to a Google account. If he has to have a Windows laptop, look at Dell, HP, and Lenovo. An iPad is another option.

Watch Tom from Los Angeles, CA Comments

Tom is worried that the Internet will become overloaded if everyone is staying at home. Leo says that it'll work just fine. Networks are engineered with overcapacity now, and there won't be an issue. What about bandwidth caps? Leo says those were more about making money than anything having to do with capability for load. Leo also says one of the problems is people who don't have internet access and rely on work, schools or libraries, will be cut off.  And he thinks the next few months will show that. Leo also says the FCC needs to reexamine the virtual monopolies that cable and internet companies have on providing broadband. The more providers, the cheaper it is, and the wider the availability for everyone.