Tech news

Police Department Gets Search Warrant for Entire Community's Google Searches

Episode 1372

Google logo

The police department in Edina, MN has secured the right to look at people's Google Search history to look for information about a fraud case they were investigating. The legal brief is to cover anyone who searched for the name of the suspect and case, and it could be the entire community.

Leo says it's crazy and that Google should fight this tooth and nail. It's classic government overreach. Leo says he doesn't mind Google's algorithm putting custom ads on his search results, but for a government to ask who searched for something and to get a list is frightening.

Do We Really Need Daylight Saving Time?

Episode 1371

Clock

24% more heart attacks, increased traffic accidents, and a wholesale lack of productivity is the byproduct of continuing to use Daylight Saving Time. Leo says it's an outdated concept whose liabilities outweigh the benefits, and we should simply get rid of it. It's important to know what is more high tech and what isn't. Your phone will automatically reflect the change, but your alarm clock will not. Change.org even has a petition to rid the world of Daylight Saving Time.

Vault 7 Showing How CIA Hacks for Spying

Episode 1370

CIA

Wikileaks has announced Vault 7, a massive collection of documents that show how the CIA uses malware and other hacking techniques to spy online. Some of the techniques includes using smartTVs as a spying device since they use cameras and microphones built into the TVs. Samsung warned of this in their terms of service for their TVs last year. But Leo says that the CIA doesn't really have a switch to turn on all TVs, and if they did, the data they'd receive would be so massive and 99.9% of it would be useless. It could be used for targeted eavesdropping, though.

SNAP IPO Launches at $17 a Share, with $34 Billion Value

Episode 1368

Snap's IPO was launched yesterday, selling at $17 a share, with total value of $34 Billion. That's a heck of a lot for a single app called Snapchat. But is it worth more than Marriot? Leo says it's rather over valued. Why is it so high in value? Leo says that people wants to know how to reach young people and Snapchat is where the kids are. Kids don't watch TV anymore, they watch YouTube and talk amongst themselves. And Snapchat is their platform.

Microsoft To Defer HoloLens to 2019

Episode 1366

Microsoft Hololens

In the hopes of avoiding a repeat of the mistakes made with rushing a product out to market, Microsoft has announced that development of their mixed reality HoloLens device will be deferred to at least 2019. The hope is that they can avoid any similar mistakes that made the launch of the Kinect camera so problematic. Meanwhile, people can still get the current developer edition for $3500.

Read more at theverge.com.

FCC Backs Away From Allowing Personal Set Top Cable Boxes

Episode 1360

Ajit Pai being sworn in as FCC Chairman

With the new chairman and his anti net neutrality views, the FCC has changed direction on a rule that would require cable companies to allow users to use third party set top boxes. Leo said it was a great idea, but in reality, cable companies were starting to see the handwriting on the wall that cutting the cable is gathering speed. The FCC has also allowed for zero rating, where you can get free data if you watch streaming from partnered services.

Department of Transportation Concludes Tesla Crash Investigation

Episode 1357

Tesla Autosteer

An interesting fact emerged from the US Highway Safety Investigation of the Tesla on Autopilot that killed its driver. While it didn't save the driver in this case, the data from all Teslas with autopilot show that it does save lives. The driver of the vehicle in question wasn't paying attention, and as a result, was the victim of his own negligence.

Read more at Mashable.com

Did the Russians Really Hack Us or Not?

Episode 1352

hacking

The Russian hacking story is now all over the news, especially after the joint agency report about the hacking. Many security experts aren't basing their assessment on that report, and it was most likely misdirection for public consumption having nothing to do with the actual information. In the report, they listed about a hundred IP addresses that they believe were used by Russian government hackers. The problem with those IP addresses is that a lot of them are TOR exit nodes, which could have been used by anyone.