Tech news

San Francisco Company Selling Exploits to the iPhone

Episode 1319

Apple iPhone 6s

Remember when Apple refused to unlock an iPhone because to do so would unlock all phones? Well the company NSO Group has found several flaws in the iPhone operating system and they've been selling exploits to governments to spy on dissidents. They've apparently had the exploit for three years and have been selling it. Apple has moved to patch the exploits that have been reported, but the question is, have they gotten them all? Leo says there's something wrong about selling the ability to spy on people.

Samsung Recalls Galaxy Note 7 Amidst Exploding Batteries

Episode 1319

Samsung Galaxy Note 7

This week, after reports that over 35 batteries in the Samsung Galaxy Note 7 have exploded, Samsung has stopped sales of the Android phone and recalled them. Leo says that part of the problem may be the fast charge option. Leo recommends that if you have a Note 7, take no chances, and return it. T-Mobile is offering loaners until they have been replaced or refunded. Leo says that Samsung is doing the right thing, even though it will hurt the bottom line. Back it up, remove your SIM and bring it back to the place you got it.

New Exploit Gives Governments the ability to hack into iPhone

Episode 1317

Remember the legal battle that Apple fought against the US Government to prevent unlocking of the iPhone's encryption? The US Gov't ended up going to a third party company who had created a hack to do it. Now that hack is being used to unlock and peer into the mobile phones of dissidents and other undesirable elements that the government wants to keep tabs on. Even reporters. Leo says that Apple has pushed out a fix to block it, and everyone should install iOS 9.5.3 to stop it. Otherwise, you're vulnerable.

Microsoft's First Windows 10 Update Meets Widespread Criticism

Episode 1313

Microsoft Windows 10 Start Menu

Microsoft's first anniversary update has broken many peripherals and applications. Leo says that since it's more difficult to roll back now that the Windows 10 deadline has passed, it comes down to waiting for your device or application to fix the issue with a new update or driver. Leo says that Microsoft should take a page from Linux and have a stable version when their updates start crashing systems.

The chatroom also says that Microsoft has reduced the rollback window from 30 days to 10 days. Leo says that still should be enough to determine if you like Windows 10 or not.

Free Upgrade Period for Windows 10 Has Passed, but There Are Exceptions

Episode 1309

Microsoft Windows 10

The general public deadline to get Windows 10 has passed and if you want to upgrade now, it'll cost you $129. However, if you are reliant on assistive technologies like screen readers, and have to wait for those to be upgraded, Microsoft will give you some extra time to upgrade at no cost. Microsoft will update the OS two or three times a year from now on. The first big update is coming next week on August 2nd.

Vulnerability Found in Apple's macOS and iOS

Episode 1308

MacBook Air, iPhone, iPad

Cisco has found a vulnerability similar to the Android text exploit, which could take control of your mobile phone through a text message. Leo says that Apple has released a patch to close the hole before anyone else had discovered it. This affects iOS, watchOS, macOS, and tvOS. Mavericks and Yosemite users don't have a fix yet, though, so those users should disable iMessage until they do. If you can't get past Mavericks because your desktop is too old, turn off iMessages permanently.

Microsoft to Redesign Skype

Episode 1307

Microsoft has announced that they will be replacing the peer to peer voiceover IP scheme in Skype with a native server that will route the traffic in a more traditional way. And in doing so, they promise a “lighter, faster and more responsive UWP app for Windows 10, Skype for iPhone, iPad and Android." But it'll be a bumpy ride for Mac and Linux users, and even Windows phone users, until they do. Leo says that Skype has been improving in it's quality of late and it could be that Microsoft's tweaking of the code is a good thing.