Net Neutrality

Verizon Severely Throttles Fire Department Wi-Fi Access During Emergency

Fire Truck

Episode 1517

This week Verizon Wireless severely throttled the wireless internet speeds of the Santa Clara Fire Department, unless the department paid double. Verizon says it was merely a mistake and has nothing to do with new net neutrality rules. Leo says that throttling the fire department is a danger to public safety and doesn't buy the excuse. But it'll take years to settle in court, if it goes at all.

What do you think of the Amazon Fire TV Cube?

Amazon Fire TV Cube

Episode 1500

GJ from Snohomish, WA

Leo says the Echo powered Fire TV Cube is cool because all he'd have to do is tell it to watch the show he wants, and it turns on the TV, switches to the right input, and starts the show. Then when he leaves, he can just say "TV off" and everything will turn off, which is nice. GJ noticed it talks about an ARC port with HDMI. Leo says it would like to get CEC and the Audio Return Channel, but it's not required.

GJ also noticed that YouTube Red changed to YouTube Premium. Leo says it's still the same thing, where he would pay a fee for no ads and access to Google's music offering.

Why should Net Neutrality Rules stay in effect?

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Ajit_V._Pai_official_photo.jpg

Episode 1487

Dave from Livingston, MT

Dave is worried that Net Neutrality gives the government too much control over the internet. Leo says that's not really true. Without Net Neutrality, the large corporations control the internet. Is that better? The essence of Net Neutrality is that all bits are equal. Companies can't charge an extra fee based on what the traffic is. Net Neutrality ensures that the Internet remains free and open. Net Neutrality doesn't regulate the internet, it regulates the companies that provide Internet access.

Does net neutrality affect access in Canada?

FCC

Episode 1456

Isaac from Ontario, Canada

Isaac is worried that the new Net Neutrality rules in the US will affect his internet access in Canada. How can he get involved to try and prevent that? Leo says that as the US goes, so goes the world. Net Neutrality is definitely in jeopardy all around the world, and it's difficult to get his voice heard in the face of huge companies with a lot of money to buy access. But in Canada, the law requires ISPs be treated as utilities. So they can only go so far in protecting under those regulations.

Isn't it good that there will be less regulation of the internet?

Network Neutrality

Episode 1450

Bryan from Panama City, FL

Bryan wants to know if Leo is for or against repealing the Net Neutrality rules. Leo says he's definitely against repealing it, as he believes it will benefit the big ISP companies and not the end user. Sure, it's government regulation, but if you trust the water coming out of your tap, why not trust regulating the internet to keep it open and neutral? By throwing out rules that keep ISPs common carriers under Title 2, it now gives ISPs the power to do whatever they want and charge whatever they want. Leo understands the mistrust of government. Many technology types are libertarians.

Why do I have to pay a monthly fee for the internet?

Internet

Episode 1450

Michael from Grand Rapids, MI

Michael wants to know if the internet is just one computer talking to another, why do we need to pay ISPs for the privilege? Leo says because someone has to build the roads between them. So he's essentially paying the toll. But our internet freedom is at stake as Net Neutrality is under threat. Service providers want to charge both ways and they want to prioritize traffic. Net Neutrality is the idea that bits are bits and it shouldn't be that way. Leo says to go to SaveTheInternet.com to get involved in protecting Net Neutrality.

Isn't it good that there will be less regulation of the internet?

Network Neutrality

Episode 1449

Bryan from Panama City, FL

Bryan wants to know if Leo is for or against repealing the Net Neutrality rules. Leo says he's definitely against repealing it, as he believes it will benefit the big ISP companies and not the end user. Sure, it's government regulation, but if you trust the water coming out of your tap, why not trust regulating the internet to keep it open and neutral? By throwing out rules that keep ISPs common carriers under Title 2, it now gives ISPs the power to do whatever they want and charge whatever they want. Leo understands the mistrust of government. Many technology types are libertarians.

RIP Net Neutrality

Ajit Pai

Episode 1448

In a strict party-line vote, the FCC voted 3-2 to kill Net Neutrality rules, in spite of overwhelming support to protect it. Leo says that while the rules were in place in 2015, we've really had it since the beginning. Leo says he believes the smaller ISPs will probably still keep the spirit of Net Neutrality, but he believes the bigger companies like Time Warner, Comcast and others will probably charge Google, Facebook, and others for access to their customers. He doesn't believe at this point that customers will see a direct impact, though.

Net Neutrality Rules May Be Thrown out Next Month

Ajit Pai

Episode 1442

Leo says that the FCC has decided to completely ignore the comments of the public, which amounted to nearly 50 million, and apparently will toss out existing Net Neutrality rules. Most people just don't care that much about it. We have fought this back time and time again, but Leo says we're probably going to lose this round, and heaven only knows what will happen next.

Read more at nytimes.com.

What are my options for rural internet access?

Network cable

Episode 1428

Lucas from Santa Barbara, CA

Lucas does a lot of video streaming and gaming, but he's moving to a rural area and will have to find new high speed internet. What can he do? Leo says that rural internet access is a real issue here and Leo doesn't believe the FCC cares enough to make it happen. Satellite isn't the answer because it's got terrible latency and bandwidth caps. That being said, the best satellite provider is WildBlue's Exede. It's that or dialup.