headphones

Scott Wilkinson ... near and dear to hear

Scott Wilkinson

Episode 1570

Scott Wilkinson joins us to talk about hearing loss. Tomorrow is World Hearing Day and Scott says hearing loss is caused by being exposed to sounds that are simply too loud. That means loud music, listening to headphones, etc. You can get custom moulded headphones with flat filters that will help musicians and radio people save their hearing. Puro Sound Labs is offering wireless, Bluetooth, noise cancelling headphones for kids, and they limit sound to 85db. Leo says Etymotics has Etymotics Kids as well.

Scott Wilkinson on Home Theater

Scott Wilkinson

Episode 1558

Scott is back from CES and this week he wants to talk about the audio gadgets he saw. A lot of the high end audio was at the Venetian Hotel. But Scott says that audio had a much smaller presence at CES this year, and Scott thinks that audio companies are going to be going to regional shows to offer their goods rather than spend a ton of money at CES. And it's difficult to rise above the noise at a larger convention. Smaller, regional shows offer a big fish in a small pond kind of vibe.

Can I watch TV with headphones and speakers?

Vizio Sound Bar

Episode 1549

Don from Santa Barbara, CA

Don recently bought a new LG TV, and he likes to watch TV with ear phones, but his wife doesn't. When he uses the earphone jack, it shuts off the speakers. What can he do? Leo says the easiest way to do it is to use dual audio outputs. Leo recommends a sound bar that he can plug into the optical port, and then he can use the headphones with the headphone jack. Vizio makes a good budget sound bar for around $100. The other option is an analog splitter.

Why don't my headphones work with my home theater system?

Optical splitter

Episode 1541

Eileen from Upland, CA

Eileen bought a Bose sound system, which is connected to an optical splitter, so they can use her headphones too. But now the headphones won't work after a power surge. Leo says it's possible that the power surge fried the optical splitter. She should check if the headphones work with her TV (she may need to change her audio settings in the TV). It may also be possible that the settings changed in her TV, so she should look in there and see what it's offering. She may need to reset it to PCM unencoded audio or something similar. She should just try different settings.

What wireless headphones should I get for watching TV?

Sennheiser RS 120 II

Episode 1532

Seth from Long Beach, CA

Both of Seth's parents are now hard of hearing and they need headphones to watch TV. Is there a system that can do it for them? Leo says that hearing aids now can pair to the TV. So if they need a hearing aid, that's a good feature to get. But if he wants headphones, Leo got his mother a pair of Sennheiser wireless RF headphones. They work much better than Bluetooth.

Why do my AirPods keep dropping their connection?

Apple AirPods

Episode 1518

Neil from Phoenix, AZ

Neil has Apple AirPods, and he says that the connection drops out a lot. Leo says that's because it uses Bluetooth and it's an antiquated technology that wasn't all that great to begin with. Bluetooth is well known for not always maintaining a stable connection. But Apple has put AirPods on deep discount and Leo suspects a version 2 is coming next month.

Dick DeBartolo, The Giz Wiz

Dick DeBartolo

Episode 1501

Here's a totally new product from Bose. No, it's not active noise reduction, which Bose is famous for, but a brand new way to mask annoying nighttime noises. Things like noisy neighbors, construction; or when traveling, vending machines, elevators, etc. Active noise reduction doesn't work for sleep, so they came up with a new technology, noise-masking. The new device is dubbed Bose sleepbuds. They don't (and can't) stream music, but they offer 10 preloaded soothing sound tracks (water, rustling leaves, crackling fire, etc.) designed to match and mask the unwanted noise.