baluns

How can I extend my HDMI signal on my TV?

HDMI Extender

Episode 1495

Jeff from Marshall, IL

Jeff wants to extend the range of HDMI to other parts of his house. But when he does, he starts to lose signal. What can he do? Leo says that Baluns are good for that. It stands for "Balanced/Unbalanced" and it will convert HDMI to ethernet and back to HDMI so that he can stretch it hundreds of feet with no signal loss at all. Jeff should check out Monoprice.

How long can I run an HDMI cable?

HDMI Extender

Episode 1376

Brian from Montebello, CA

Brian is building a new house and is putting his AV stuff in a closet, but he needs to run a long HDMI cable. How long could he go? Leo says he won't want to go longer than 3 feet. So going with an ethernet connection with baluns on either side is the way to go. It'll amplify the signal and he can go as long as he needs. It's also called an HDMI Extender. He can find one at Monoprice here.

How can I run a TV signal to another building?

Episode 1284

Jim from Oxnard, CA

Jim's church has an auxiliary building that's about 300 feet away and they'd like to create a connection in order to broadcast the church service when they need overflow seating. Leo says he can create a directional Wi-Fi setup that will beam the service directly to the building without the need to deploy cable. He should check out this article at RadioLabs.com. It won't cost any more than running an HDMI cable.

How can I extend the range of my video signal?

Episode 1234

Steve from Chino Hills, CA

Steve has a Security Camera DVR and he's used a splitter to watch it in several rooms using a balun, but he keeps losing the signal. Leo says that HDMI doesn't throw very far, and using a balun amplifies the signal and sends it over ethernet to the other side. The distance is still limited to around 200' and it could be that he's at the extreme edge of the range. Steve could go RF. The chat room says that using Cat6 Ethernet cables could make it that far, and at MonoPrice.com he could get an extender kit to around 328 feet.

How can I run HDMI 50 feet or more?

HDMI Cable

Episode 1209

Glen from Rolling Heights, CA

Glen wants to split his TV signal via HDMI. It works for a minute and then it gets really dark. Leo says the challenge is that Glen is splitting the signal and then transporting it over a greater distance. So chances are it's dropping bits due to interference. That's why Leo says a Balun is a better choice. He can then send HDMI over ethernet and the signal is amplified over both ends. It's much better and not very expensive. Glen can check out HDMI Extenders or Baluns at monoprice.com.

There is a good wireless HDMI option.

HDMI

Episode 1131

George from Toronto, Canada

George is a system integrator and he knows about wireless HDMI. George says that video scalers like DVDo.com have wireless HDMI 60Hz solutions that work really well because it handles spectrum that isn't used much. It works great -- up to 50 feet. And the walls aren't really an issue. George says that doing it through Cat5 or Cat 6 and baluns work as the best option in that case.

Scott Wilkinson Gets Wired

Scott Wilkinson

Episode 1065

Scott Wilkinson joins us right after the talk about cat6 Ethernet to talk home theater. Scott says that as we get more and more into 4K, and as ultra high definition gets into the home, the need for high quality compression and high speed routing is very important. Not only is resolution important, but color gamut is as well, since it provides a smooth gradient of color. We're already running into the limits of HDMI 2.1 with those specs. Leo says that HDMI over Ethernet can be done with baluns on either end to convert from HDMI to Ethernet and back.

How can I send video through a cable over a long distance?

Episode 1037

Tom from California

Tom has to route video through a cable that's over a hundred feet long. He also wants to split the video signal to two different projectors. Leo says that attenuation will be an issue causing the signal to fade and drop. Leo recommends using Baluns for long distances. They essentially convert the signal to Ethernet and then back to video on the other end. He'll need a VGA to Baluns adapter on either end. Cat5 is best. He can also go with HDMI and Coax.