Networking

Wi-Fi routers, home servers, virtual private networks, and more.

Can a VPN Fool Others About My Location?

VPN

Episode 1792

Nolan from Los Angeles, CA

Nolan wants to know if he can use a VPN to make networks think he's somewhere else. Leo says yes, that's pretty much what the VPN does. Some people use VPNs to stream other countries' video streams for that very reason. VPNs have a client and a server. The client goes on the users' PC, while the server is somewhere else. Users then log into the VPN, and the IP address will be wherever they connect to it. But there is a catch. VPN providers use a pool of IP addresses that they own, and they identify them as VPN addresses.

Is the 77" LG OLED the Best to View Photography?

77 inch C1 OLED

Episode 1791

Dennis from Marina Del Rey, CA

Ken recently automated his home with Google Nest, but the problem he's having is that when he's asking his phone to take a picture, he's told by Google Nest that they can't do that. Leo says that's a common issue as sometimes, Google doesn't know where to process a request. That goes away over time as Nest learns speech patterns. It also helps to be more specific in commands.

Why Can't I Suddenly Get WiFi?

WiFi!

Episode 1789

Seraphine from Los Angeles, CA

Seraphine is suddenly suffering from no WiFi. She was "borrowing a cup" from a neighbor, but now she can't get it. Leo says it's possible that the modem has died and you need another. Or you have a bad cable. It's also possible that the WiFI router is bad. If it's a router/modem combo, even more so.  The lights on your modem mean something, and if you look at the manual, it'll tell you if there's something wrong. Routers can also wear out. It may be time to replace it. 

How Can I Assign IP Addresses to Everything on My Home Network?

IP Address

Episode 1784

Mark from Studio City, CA

Mark's home wifi modem has run out of ethernet ports. So he bought a five port gigabit switch, but nothing really works. Leo says that everything has to have a unique IP address, so a switch won't work. You need a router, which will assign unique addresses to everything you need to plug into your network. Connect the switch to the router's ethernet port, and then the router will assign the IPs as needed. 

How Can I Get My Company to Password Protect Its Files?

OneDrive

Episode 1783

Karen from California

Karen's work stores their data up in the cloud, but her boss wants to password protect all files because he isn't thrilled with anyone in the company having access to all their data on One Drive. Leo says that Microsoft's Sharepoint is a collaborative security service, which allows companies to provide permissions to folders, files, and other data. Microsoft One Drive for Business also has that feature. 

What Router Should I Buy?

Routers

Episode 1782

Rick from Capistrano Beach, CA

Rick has been having issues with his wifi router. He has dropouts, and he has to unplug it and plug it back along with his modem. Leo says that when a router starts to fail a lot, that indicates that it's wearing out and it's time to replace it. Leo says that if you are renting from your ISP, he recommends turning in your cable modem and request a new DOCSIS 3.1 model. Or buy your own and save the rental fee.  Should he get a mesh router? Leo says that if you have a house that's greater than 1300 sq. feet, then it's worth it. But smaller than that, and a regular router is fine.

How Can I Bond Two ISPs So That One Takes Over Automatically When the Other Drops Out?

Speedify VPN

Episode 1781

Gary from Buffalo, NY

Gary has two internet services, T-Mobile and Spectrum. One is for work. He wants to be able to hook them up, so if one goes down, the other picks up. But there's a lag when he uses Zoom. Leo says you can do it with Speedify. It's a VPN that does what's called "failover." But it causes that latency because it goes through different servers. Leo does it with his Ubiquity router Edge Router X and two WAN ports. There's zero latency. TPLink also does that, and they make good stuff. 

Is WPA2 Secure?

WiFi

Episode 1776

Jeff from Pasadena, CA

Jeff is getting a warning about his WPA2 WiFi encryption. Should he move to a new router? Leo says that WPA2 was cracked, but he'd really have to have someone targeting him to really worry about it. WPA3 is the new standard and routers are starting to include it, but Leo doesn't think there's anything to worry about. He could check the router's firmware update to see if they offer it now. How about separating the SSID for the 2.4Ghz and 5.0Ghz bands? Leo says he can do that, but won't really have to.