wide angle photography

Chris Marquardt ... A Wider Angle

Chris Marquardt

Episode 1641

Chris joins us to talk about using Wider Angles. The new iPhone has a .5x ultra wide-angle lens, and often we can include things in our pictures that we don't want. So Chris recommends doing a background check to see what is in the background. Also, do a "border patrol" and check what's at the edges of your image. See what's going on as it might be intruding in the frame. 

Another issue with ultra wide-angle is a slight distortion at the edges of the frame. Anything at the edge can get stretched. To avoid it, place your subject more towards the middle. 

Chris Marquardt on Photography

Chris Marquardt

Episode 1409

Chris is just finishing up a book on Wide Angle Photography. The human eye is roughly 180 degrees from one edge of the human eye to another. A shorter focal length than 50mm is considered wide angle. The larger the number in mm, the narrower the angle. The thing about wide angle is that you have the advantage of being able to include more information in the image. They're great for portraits and landscapes. But the downside is, the wider the angle, the more distorted the image will look. Suddenly your subject's head will look larger, or features on their face will become exaggerated.

Chris Marquardt on Photography

Chris Marquardt

Episode 1367

Chris says that Wide Angle Photography is somewhat of a lost art. Going as wide as possible can give a weird look to your image if you tip the camera one way or the other because of lens distortion. This can make shooting wide a challenge, especially if you're shooting architecture. It's called "falling lines." How you can avoid this is to step back farther and go more telephoto to achieve the same look. Or you can change your perspective. Go higher up, which will mean you won't have to tilt your camera as much.