VPNs

How Can I Stream Video Overseas?

Tiny Hardware Firewall

Episode 1836

Mike from Burnsville, MN

Mike is going to be in the Philippines and will have to quarantine for a week. How can he watch Netflix and other streaming? Leo says to use a VPN. Virtual Private Networks will mask your location and bypass any geographic restrictions. Most will let you choose a location for your server so that it makes you appear to be in the proper country. Leo recommends ExpressVPN. It works quite well with overseas streaming restrictions. Leo also recommends a travel router like the Tiny Hardware Firewall, which comes with its own VPN.

Is a Public Apartment WiFi Network Secure?

WiFi

Episode 1814

Rudy from Montreal, Quebec, CAN

Rudy wants to know how secure public apartment wifi is if everyone is using the same password? Leo says it's not secure at all. What it means though, is that anyone who knows the password can use the wifi. But it also means that if someone is malicious, they can use hacking tools to gain access to other people's computers and data. That's why Leo says that a VPN is a must for a situation like this. Or at least only surfing to HTTPS websites only, so the traffic is encrypted. Another option is to use a travel router. It's designed to join a public network and provides a barrier like a VPN.

Why Won't Gmail Let Me Log in Through a VPN or Hotspot?

Gmail

Episode 1809

Ken from Topinabee, MI

Ken has a number of emails running in Outlook. A few are Gmail. Everything works fine at home, but Gmail thinks he's being hacked and won't let him log in when he uses a hotspot or VPNs. So he has to go outside the VPN to log into Gmail in order to register the IP. And that only works sometimes. Leo says to go into the Outlook settings and make sure you have a proper profile created using GMail's SMTP for those Gmail addresses, along with your login and password. Leo suspects that is where the hiccup lies. Also, turn on two-factor authentication.

Why Can't I Hear Ad Breaks on Streaming Radio?

iHeartRadio

Episode 1802

David from Washington DC

David listens to the iHeartRadio App but he doesn't get the ads, which he enjoys. Leo says that ads are either different or disappear on the streaming app because advertisers don't want to pay for them on the streaming service. This can either be because they are cost-prohibitive, or that an international audience is of little benefit to particular advertisers. And the station doesn't want to give them a freebie. So they get edited out. It's just the nature of streaming radio. One way around this could be to use a VPN to mask location. 

Can a VPN Fool Others About My Location?

VPN

Episode 1792

Nolan from Los Angeles, CA

Nolan wants to know if he can use a VPN to make networks think he's somewhere else. Leo says yes, that's pretty much what the VPN does. Some people use VPNs to stream other countries' video streams for that very reason. VPNs have a client and a server. The client goes on the users' PC, while the server is somewhere else. Users then log into the VPN, and the IP address will be wherever they connect to it. But there is a catch. VPN providers use a pool of IP addresses that they own, and they identify them as VPN addresses.

How Can I Bond Two ISPs So That One Takes Over Automatically When the Other Drops Out?

Speedify VPN

Episode 1781

Gary from Buffalo, NY

Gary has two internet services, T-Mobile and Spectrum. One is for work. He wants to be able to hook them up, so if one goes down, the other picks up. But there's a lag when he uses Zoom. Leo says you can do it with Speedify. It's a VPN that does what's called "failover." But it causes that latency because it goes through different servers. Leo does it with his Ubiquity router Edge Router X and two WAN ports. There's zero latency. TPLink also does that, and they make good stuff. 

Can I Use a Vpn to Mask My Activity and Movements?

VPN

Episode 1780

Wallace from Fredrick, MD

Wallace wants to know if he needs a VPN or can authorities still track his activity and movements. Leo says that using a VPN will mask your activity unless your VPN keeps track of that activity. With a warrant, they would have to provide that data. As for movements, your cellphone has a GPS, and with a simple request (called a PIN Registry), the authorities can access your location at any given time for a fee. But that is changing as courts recognize that it is a violation of privacy and should require a warrant.

How Can I Protect My Network While Streaming Through a VPN?

THF

Episode 1774

Steve from Encinada, MX

Steve wants to know how he can stream on-demand using a satellite receiver. Leo says that using a VPN through a router could work, his whole network would then appear to be in the US. Leo says he can also use a raspberry pi to run in between it and the streamer. He also wants to be sure his wifi network is protected. Leo recommends also getting the Tiny Hardware Firewall. It uses their VPN or TOR to route the signal. However, it may not be fast enough to stream video.