VPNs

Can a VPN Fool Others About My Location?

VPN

Episode 1792

Nolan from Los Angeles, CA

Nolan wants to know if he can use a VPN to make networks think he's somewhere else. Leo says yes, that's pretty much what the VPN does. Some people use VPNs to stream other countries' video streams for that very reason. VPNs have a client and a server. The client goes on the users' PC, while the server is somewhere else. Users then log into the VPN, and the IP address will be wherever they connect to it. But there is a catch. VPN providers use a pool of IP addresses that they own, and they identify them as VPN addresses.

How Can I Bond Two ISPs So That One Takes Over Automatically When the Other Drops Out?

Speedify VPN

Episode 1781

Gary from Buffalo, NY

Gary has two internet services, T-Mobile and Spectrum. One is for work. He wants to be able to hook them up, so if one goes down, the other picks up. But there's a lag when he uses Zoom. Leo says you can do it with Speedify. It's a VPN that does what's called "failover." But it causes that latency because it goes through different servers. Leo does it with his Ubiquity router Edge Router X and two WAN ports. There's zero latency. TPLink also does that, and they make good stuff. 

Can I Use a Vpn to Mask My Activity and Movements?

VPN

Episode 1780

Wallace from Fredrick, MD

Wallace wants to know if he needs a VPN or can authorities still track his activity and movements. Leo says that using a VPN will mask your activity unless your VPN keeps track of that activity. With a warrant, they would have to provide that data. As for movements, your cellphone has a GPS, and with a simple request (called a PIN Registry), the authorities can access your location at any given time for a fee. But that is changing as courts recognize that it is a violation of privacy and should require a warrant.

How Can I Protect My Network While Streaming Through a VPN?

THF

Episode 1774

Steve from Encinada, MX

Steve wants to know how he can stream on-demand using a satellite receiver. Leo says that using a VPN through a router could work, his whole network would then appear to be in the US. Leo says he can also use a raspberry pi to run in between it and the streamer. He also wants to be sure his wifi network is protected. Leo recommends also getting the Tiny Hardware Firewall. It uses their VPN or TOR to route the signal. However, it may not be fast enough to stream video.

Why Use a VPN?

ExpressVPN

Episode 1758

Vino from Las Vegas, NV

Vino wants to know why people use a VPN. Leo says that a VPN is a virtual private network. It burrows an encrypted tube from a user's computer to the destination. It's very good for Privacy and Security. Especially when on public WiFi. VPNs can also mask physical location, so people don't know where users are. Great if a user wants to watch TV in another country like Great Britain.

What about the incognito mode in a browser? Leo says that private browser mode doesn't mask IP address. So people can still see where the traffic is going to.

How can I use a VPN with my Ubiquity router?

ExpressVPN (Sponsor of the TWiT network)

Episode 1756

Bernie from Lakewood, CO

Bernie wants to use ExpressVPN (a sponsor of the TWiT network) using his Ubuity router. How can he put it on and keep it working for his main network and his guest network? Leo says that there is a recommended list of routers that you can use with ExpressVPN; sadly, Ubiquity isn't one of them. But some of the privacy features a VPN does are available from your Ubiquity router. Your DNS lookup, for instance, can be secured using your browser via DNS over HTTPS via DOH. It's deep into the settings. You can also use another DNS server that can block them.

Why do I keep having to log in when I go online with my VPN?

MacBook Air

Episode 1749

Ed from Huntington Beach, CA

Mike is having issues with his Macbook Air forgetting his passwords when he's online. He constantly has to log in. Leo says that this is a common problem with macOS, especially when you have 2 Factor Authentication enabled. And if you're using a VPN, your location isn't the same, which could be prompting macOS to make you log in again. Apple is good on security, obsessed with it actually. As such, it's likely that since Mike is using a VPN, the location changes, and thus, macOS requires a new login. So try turning off your VPN and see if the issue continues.