Tech news

Happy Anniversary to the Tech Guy

 Blade Runner

Episode 1657

Today marks the beginning of the 17th year of the Tech Guy Show, and Leo says it's just plain odd. It's 2020, the distant future is here. But it looks nothing like Blade Runner. In fact, it's not that much different from 2000 or even 1995, except slightly better technology. Science Fiction promised flying cars, living on other planets, and the virtual metaverse (ala Ready Player One). But we're barely starting to crack self-driving cars, and VR is a disappointment so far.

Hacker Uses Ring Camera to Pretend he's Santa, Talking to a Child

Ring

Episode 1652

This is creepy. A hacker managed to hack into a ring camera placed in the bedroom of an 8-year-old girl, and then pretended he was Santa Claus talking to her. RING said it wasn't a breach in Ring's security, but was due to the parent not using a unique user name and password. She used the same one as for other things, making it really easy to breach. Leo says that hackers can read a unique signature for internet enabled cameras and then can use that login to brute force it open. Leo says to stop reusing the same password. That's a recipe for calamity.

Black Friday Numbers Indicate A New Sales High, but ...

Black Friday

Episode 1649

The sales numbers are in from Black Friday. Although sales hit a new high, they were below expectations, according to Adobe. $7.4 Billion in online shopping, half of which were for smartphones. Sales of which were up 20%.

Top toy sales were for Frozen 2, LOL Surprise, and then Paw Patrol. Best selling video games FIFA, Madden 2020, and the Nintendo Switch system. Apple Airpods, Macbooks, and TVs topped the electronics list. And over $2.9 billion made on smartphones, constituting 60% of all online traffic. Leo suspects that next year, smartphones will be the #1 way to shop. 

Is Big Tech is Destroying Our World?

Amazon

Episode 1648

Leo says that many are complaining that big tech is far too intrusive and is destroying our privacy. But Leo says that this is largely overblown with people acting like "privacy puritans." A lot of it can be mitigated by Big Tech keeping our data secure and coming out with an accurate and truthful privacy statement for all to see. If we give up some data privacy for free services, Big Tech should treat it as a public trust, and give customers the right to opt-out.