scams

Did I Almost Get Hacked?

https://amzn.to/3aQDZ0L

Episode 1721

Rio James from Escondido, CA

Rio James recently got an email thanking him for payment and comes with a statement attached. But he never made such a payment. He knew right away that it was a phishing scam. Leo agrees, saying that the idea is to get him to open an attached PDF File that has been corrupted with a worm or virus. In many cases, it's harmless if the software and Windows are updated. If not, then it can take over a machine. The whole idea is to play on fear and greed, even curiosity, and get him to click on the link without thinking. So RJ was wise not to open it. 

"Vishing" is the latest online scam to steal your company login information

VISHING

Episode 1721

Much like phishing and spear-phishing, VISHING is the latest online scam designed to steal your logins. Only VISHING uses voicemail to do it, according to the FBI and the Cyber Security Agency (CISA). They are targeted attacks on employees of corporations using voicemail to get users working at home to call back and then use social engineering to steal VPN credentials. Check out Brian Krebs' article here.

How Can I Be Sure My Mom's Computer Hasn't Been Hacked?

Windows 10

Episode 1717

Matt from Portland, OR

Matt's mom got bit by a remote access scam and he's gotta clean up her computer to make sure it's secure. Leo says it's a common scam designed to get one to launching the "event launcher" which will show "red x's", which Leo says are perfectly normal. But if she doesn't know that, it'll make her think there's something wrong with her computer. But there isn't. Then they'll try and get her to give them a credit card to pay to fix it remotely. That gives them her credit card. Once that's done, they'll tell her they need remote access.

Is My Email Compromised?

Episode 1699

Brad from San Diego, CA

Brad says that his company email looks to be compromised. Leo says it's more likely his email address has been "spoofed" by spammers, and it's really easy to falsify or spoof a reply email address. Sooner or later, they will move on to a new random return address. That's why everyone gets spam and even bounced back emails that don't work. So it's unlikely Brad's email address has been compromised, just spoofed.

How can I guard against scams like cross-site scripting?

Cross-site scripting example

Episode 1629

Jay from Providence, North Carolina

Jay wants to know how he can avoid cross-site Scripting attacks. Leo says that you could turn off javascript, but that would make most of the web unusable. Leo uses UBlockOrigin, which is nominally an ad blocker. But it can block cross-site scripting. A good browser like Firefox will protect you as well. In the security settings, you can block a lot of things like cross-site scripting. And load a minimal set of extensions as well.

Caller has Fun with Phishing Scammers

Phishing Scammer

Episode 1607

Dave from Blackrock, AR

Dave got a call that his computer was hacked. Knowing he was being phished, he decided to have some fun with them (especially since he doesn't have a computer). Leo says it's good that Dave gave them a taste of their own medicine, but it's sad that we have to deal with scammers and end up using so much energy to protect ourselves. But while it's great Dave knew and was able to turn the tables on them, it's always best to just hang up.

Why Won't My New Lightning Cable Work with My iPod?

Episode 1607

Char from Cambridge, Minnesota

Char bought a cable for his iPod on Amazon and it wouldn't transfer data. Leo says that sometimes there are cheap cables that don't have the data channel, and are only meant for charging. The real problem is, Amazon doesn't check to make sure the vendors aren't misrepresenting their products, and it's easy to get snookered. Let the buyer beware.

Why does Facebook Want my Credit Card Number?

Facebook

Episode 1595

Bernie from San Diego, CA

Bernie is having issues logging into Facebook. He gets a popup that says he needs to give them some information, including a credit card number. Leo says that's definitely not Facebook. Facebook will ask for identification from time to time, especially if your account has been compromised, or you've lost access to your account, but Leo says to never do that with a credit card. Use other options like a utility bill. Here's some information - https://www.facebook.com/help/contact/183000765122339. Leo says it's likely a scam.

Is buying something online with eBay gift cards safe?

Episode 1561

Naomi from Denver, CO

Naomi says they are wanting to buy something online and the seller wants "eBay gift cards." Leo says that's a common scam because gift cards aren't really traceable, and you can't stop payment on them once rendered. Credit cards, or an online payment service like PayPal, offer buyer protection.Check out the book - The Confidence Game: Why We Fall for It . . . Every Time by Maria Konnikova