Roku

NBC/Peacock and Roku make up. App to Appear Soon

Peacock

Episode 1729

Caught in a battle for months, which culminated with NBC threatening to pull content from all eleven of its streaming channels, both streaming platforms have come to an agreement that will put Peacock on the Roku platform soon. Maybe within weeks. Leo says brinksmanship is becoming the norm, with a battle having to be waged before parties come together with a mutual agreement.

Why Won't My Smart TV Connect to Stream?

Roku

Episode 1717

John from Fallbrook, CA

John has a 55" Samsung TV that's about eight years old. He also moved away from surround sound to a soundbar. But even though his TV is a smart TV, it won't accept the internet signal to stream. He talked to Samsung and after resetting several times, they decided his chip was defective. Leo says that doesn't mean he'll have to get a new TV. Those smart tv apps are terrible because they are never updated. He recommends getting a ROKU device and plugging that into the HDMI port. Let the Roku handle the stream. But don't get the stick, they tend to overheat.

Why does my Roku device turn on my TV automatically?

Consumer Electronics Control Example

Episode 1710

Gloria from North Hollywood, CA

Gloria has a Roku stick plugged into her TV. But after she turns off the TV, the TV comes on automatically. What gives? Leo says that there's a feature called CEC, or consumer electronics control, which automatically if you nudge the remote and turns on the TV and sets the TV to the last thing you watched. You can turn off the feature in your Roku settings or your TV settings if you don't like it.

What TV Should I Buy?

TCL

Episode 1691

Charles from Virginia Beach, VA

Charles wants to get a new TV. But he's confused. LED. LCD. OLED? Leo says there are really only two technologies OLED and LED. LEDs are less expensive and work better in bright ambient light. OLEDs are better image quality and color, but he will need to darken the room. Then there's resolution. Most TVs now are 4K. That translates to a sharper image and with HDR, there's bolder colors and better blacks. It also gives better detail in bright light or darker scenes. Leo recommends TCL, it has Roku built-in and they are very affordable. Another option is HiSense.

How can I cut the cable?

YouTube TV

Episode 1684

Harold from West Covina, CA

Harold's father is tired of paying $200 a month to watch TV on cable. So he wants to cut the cord. He's looking at the FireTV with Sling. Leo says that the FireTV is fine, but they are engineered to encourage buying stuff from Amazon. Leo prefers the Roku player. There's also the Apple TV. Leo also recommends YouTubeTV for his local channels and other streaming options. Sling is another that's good; AT&T has one, but Leo's favorite is YouTube TV. It's $50. But that, on top of the internet, and you're already over $100.

Don't Connect Your TV to the Internet

If you're wondering if TVs are secure, they are! Just don't connect them to the internet! It sounds simple, but the temptation can be real for those who want to use apps to go online. If you keep the television offline, it can't secretly watch you (assuming the company behind it is shady). Get an Apple TV or Roku device, which are kept up to date. If your TV gets infected, the issue can even bleed into your network...which would be a huge problem.

How Can I Stream YouTube to TV?

YouTube

Episode 1677

Jerry from Pennsylvania

Jerry likes to watch YouTube on his TV, but his TV browser isn't going to be supported anymore. Leo says don't use that browser. It's terrible. Look for a YouTube app available for the smart TV and install it. Better yet, connect a Roku Box, Apple TV, Amazon FireTV or even Google Chromecast and use their interface. They will also be updated regularly. Will Samsung spy on users like they do on a TV? Leo says no. And most malware isn't targeting TV sets. Leo also advises getting a Chromebook for those "sketch sites" and a Chromecast. Then he can cast to the TV securely.

Can I still get a "dumb" TV?

"Smart" TV

Episode 1666

Rich from Santa Clarita, CA

Rich doesn't want a smart tv. Can he get a "dumb" TV anymore? Leo says not really. TV companies actually make money off the TVs online activity, and so they make all TVs that way. You can dumb down your TV by not connecting that TV to the internet. And use a third party box like Roku. Or even an inexpensive Chromecast. The best "dumbish" TV is Vizio, though.