QLED

Can a QLED TV Give Me a Headache?

QLED

Episode 1701

Larry from Petaluma, CA

Larry is trying to pair his new Samsung 55" QLED with his Denon AV. He finally got that working, but he's having an issue with headaches. Leo says that flickering may cause the issue and he recommends adjusting the frame interpolation (called Action Motion Plus in Samsungs) and see if by adjusting the refresh rate up or down will solve that issue. Most likely, going as high as he can will fix it. But he'll get that "soap opera" look. 

Is QLED the same as OLED?

QLED vs OLED

Episode 1694

Charles from Virginia Beach, VA

Charles wants to know the difference between QLED and OLED. Is QLED better? Leo says that it's more marketing. Samsung wants people to think that QLED is as good as OLED, but it's really just another LED technology with backlit LCDs. OLED is a better technology with bolder, more accurate colors and deeper, richer blacks. Is there a risk of burn-in? Leo says that modern OLEDs have solved that problem. 

Scott Wilkinson - quantum dotted

Scott Wilkinson

Episode 1691

Scott Wilkinson reports that Samsung Display will stop making LCD panels by the end of next year. The parent company, Samsung Electronics, will still make LCD TVs, getting their panels from elsewhere. But what they are going to be doing is focusing solely on QLED, quantum dot LED panels. Scott says that they are LCD TVs with a quantum dot backlight. It takes blue OLED material and passes it through quantum dot material, converting it to blue, red, or green. It's a process called Quantum Dot Conversion, or QDCC. And it'll hit the market next year. Samsung will also be making a QD OLED. 

Learn the Difference Between OLED and QLED

Sometimes it can be confusing when acronyms are nearly identical. It would be in consumers' best interest to learn the difference between OLED and QLED before browsing for new TVs. OLED stands for "organic light-emitting diode" while QLED stands for "Quantum Dot LED" (according to Samsung). Quantum dots are extremely small semiconductors that backlight a Liquid Crystal Display. Many people think "QLED" was a label intentionally chosen to look similar to "OLED", despite not being the same technology.

QLED versus OLED, and What is Microlithography?

LG B8 65" OLED - OLED65B8PUA

Episode 1603

Tom from Harrisburg, PA

Tom purchased a new OLED TV and it brought him to do research into the average diameter of an atomic nucleus and cutting circuit lines. Tom wants to know how production facilities are able to cut circuit lines so small and address the wiring grid within so that they don't overlap one another. Leo tells Tom that the process is called Microlithography, which he explains is similar to the idea of silk screening: Painters paint on a screen of silk and then apply ink to it, and the ink goes through the part of the silk that isn't painted. It's a fascinating process.

Scott Wilkinson on Home Theater

Scott Wilkinson

Episode 1537

What is the difference between OLED and QLED? Scott says that OLED is Organic Light Emitting Diodes, and is based on organic chemistry, or carbon. That's how it makes light. QLED, on the other hand, stands for Quantum Dot Light Emitting Diode, and it's just a higher end LCD TV. The light source behind the panel is using quantum dots, including LEDs to illuminate the image. They are completely different technologies. But the "QLED" term confuses people, and they may think they're getting a special OLED screen, but they aren't.

What TV should I buy?

Samsung QLED TV

Episode 1509

Michael from Miami, FL

Michael is looking to get a TV and wants to know if he should get 1080p or 4K. Leo says he should definitely get 4K moving forward. But even more importantly, he should get a TV with HDR. It has a much nicer look. Leo's choice is the LG B6 OLED. It comes down to budget though. Michael wants a TV that has no bezels. He wants to hang it on the wall like a painting preferrably an 80" model. Leo says that Vizio has a nice one.

Does Samsung's QLED TVs use OLED technology?

Samsung QLED TV

Episode 1448

David from California

David is seeing "banding" when he's watching his HDTV. What is that? Leo says that banding usually indicates compression and comes from the source material. If he wants to test it, he should hook up his TV to a Blu-Ray player and play a Blu-ray DVD. He won't see any banding because there's no compression there. But when he watches on satellite or streaming Netflix, he'll see it because the signal is compressed.