Photos

How can I save photos with the date it was taken?

EXIF Metadata

Episode 1742

Rich from West Palm Beach, FL

Rich has been scanning an archive of photos from the family history. He's used scanning services, a DIY with Epson Fast Foto, Flatbed scanners. The works. But in the last six months, he's organized the photos and then imported them into Photos. But he can't search by date. The dates have been linked according to the date it's been scanned. Leo says that Photos is using the File modification date. You can't really rely on that.

How can I backup and organize all my photos in the Cloud?

Shutterstock

Episode 1736

JC from Sherman Oaks, CA

JC has a ton of pictures on his computer and they aren't organized. It's a real mess on his hard drive. How can he organize them in the Cloud so that they are not only backed up but easier to access? Leo says that Google Photos is ideal, but they only backup unlimited hires JPEGs, not the uncompressed RAW versions that JC wants. But it's a good backup to the backup.

How Can I Securely Share Photos Online?

Google photos

Episode 1735

Bobby from Park City, UT

Bobby remodels homes and creates professional before and after images. He'd like to have a cloud-based solution to showcase the work with privacy, but also be able to share the images when interested. Leo says that Google Photos has that ability and it can be private and secure, but allow for sharing with a link. Easy and free. If Bobby is doing this commercially, G Suite is the way to go, and it offers a considerable amount of storage. Alternatives include Microsoft OneDrive. 

What Happened to My Original Photo Files?

Apple Photos

Episode 1719

Charles from Virginia

Charles is noticing several of his recent photo files aren't as large as they should be on his Mac Mini. Leo says that if Charles is using Apple Photos for an App to store his photos, to r/c on the photos library, and then select Show Package Contents, he'll see photo folders, including the "originals" photo folder. That'll verify his originals are there.

"Scan" Your Physical Photos With an Easel + Tripod + Digital Camera

If you have a bunch of photos you want to scan, Leo actually recommends getting an easel, tripod, digital camera, and good lighting. Put your picture on the easel, snap a digital photo, rinse and repeat. Modern cameras are so high-resolution that they can take pretty good photos of pictures when angled right. An alternative is to ask a service like ScanCafe, which takes mailed photos and scans them for you. Costco also has a scanning service of their own, where you can bring your pictures to them before they convert them.

Windows Disk Clean-Up Tool for Thumbnail Restoration

If you are using Windows 10 and can not see the thumbnails for your photo files (or otherwise), try rebuilding the thumbnail cache. There's a little-known program called the Windows Disk Clean-up Tool that can do the job. Select "This PC" > [Your Drive] > "Properties" and finally check the "thumbnails" option (while unchecking the other options) to rebuild the icons next to your files' names. It may take a while, but just wait it out and you should be good to go. Not everyone names all their files descriptively, so it's really handy to keep thumbnails visible!

Try Amazon Photos for Additional Cloud Backup of Your Pics

You should always back up your photos to the cloud, and many people use Google Photos. However, it is highly recommended to be prepared with a 2nd or 3rd backup in case something happens to your Google account. If you have Amazon Prime, use their unlimited uploading feature to back up your phone's pictures using Amazon's Photos app. As a Prime user, you also get to store full resolution versions of your photos, unlike Google (though limited to 5 gigabytes of video storage).