photo tips

Chris Marquardt and Street Photography

Chris Marquardt

Episode 1828

Chris joins Leo to talk about street photography. Here's the link to the sample images discussed:

https://flic.kr/y/3HVoZNH

Our next photo assignment is - MESSY. Take a photo of, about or otherwise concerning the concept of "MESSY" and then post it to the Tech Guy Group on Flickr. Make sure to tag it with the word "tgmessy" as well! And if Chris likes it, it could end up on next month's photo contest review segment!

Chris Marquardt and Practicing Abstract Photography

Chris Marquardt

Episode 1826

Chris suggests practice to train your eye. Shoot 24 pictures and stop. Focus on abstract images. See where your eye leads. 

Our current photo assignment is - MESSY. Take a photo of, about, or otherwise concerning the concept of "MESSY" and then post it to the Tech Guy Group on Flickr. Make sure to tag it with the word "tgmessy" as well! And if Chris likes it, it could end up on next month's photo contest review segment!

Chris Marquardt and Volumetric Light

Chris Marquardt

Episode 1824

This week's photo topic from Chris Marquardt is shooting with volumetric light. Light can have volume to it, as it lights up a space, especially if the light crosses dust, mist, fog, or smoke. That's how sunbeams are shown. They give the light shape, volume, and color.  You'll also see fog being used at concerts at shows so that it can give light shape for more dramatic lighting schemes. Your lens can also give light its shape due to lens flare or reflections. Also called lens bloom. If you shoot in film, there's a specific film called Aura film that can cause it.

Chris Marquardt: In Motion

Chris Marquardt

Episode 1820

We're going to look at the CAMERA IN MOTION today with Chris. Chris says today's modern cameras can make it really hard to create camera shake because of image stabilization. But it is possible to introduce motion into your photography. Set your camera on a longer exposure, and then take a picture while driving or riding the subway. You'll get neat streaks in the background. You can also try on a moving sidewalk. Very interesting.

Chris Marquardt and Shooting Water

Chris

Episode 1818

Today's Chris Marquardt photo topic is shooting pictures that have water as a subject.  Depending on how your camera is set, you can get clear or white water showing a flowing-like image. You can also make your water look like fog. Then there are reflections. Reflections are a morning thing. You want to take them early because there's no wind, no motion in the water. That gives the dramatic, crisp reflection.  Shooting reflections at night can also yield a great image, as city lights can reflect from a newly rained on-road (this is called a "wet down" that Hollywood likes to do).

Chris Marquardt and the Emptiness

Chris Marquardt

Episode 1816

Chris is back and this week he's talking about EMPTINESS and how to use it in photos. Also called negative space, it can help the viewer focus on what the subject is really all about.  But the emptiness itself can also end up being the subject of the image. And often, the surroundings aren't as empty as you think; it's just how the photographer framed the image and where it ends.

Here are a few examples: https://flic.kr/y/3HABEFi

Chris Marquardt and Black and White II

Chris Marquardt

Episode 1809

Chris is back to talk about black and white photography.  Black and white photos have an iconic look, stripping away color which can sometimes distract from what the photo is really all about. It also really looks great with geometric patterns. Of course, you can take a color picture and then strip the color information in favor of black and white, but Chris prefers to shoot the image natively in black and white because he can see in black and white as well. It'll also give you more grain information according to the lighting. 

Here are some examples - 

Chris Marquardt and Shooting the Milky Way

Chris Marquardt

Episode 1807

Chris joins Leo to talk about how to get pictures of the Milky Way. Here are photos for today's segment:

https://tfttf.com/milkyway

Summer is a great time to engage in night sky photography because it's not as cold.  But you'll need a tripod because the better night sky photos are timed photos. You use the 600 rule. Divide 600 by your focal length and you get the proper exposure time. But under 20 seconds is a good rule of thumb.