ip addresses

What Is an ARP?

How ARP Works

Episode 1826

Sean from Alta Dena, CA

Sean wants to know what an ARP is. He keeps getting that message when running ESET. Leo says that there's likely ARP Spoofing that is "spoofing" IP addresses that your computer allows through. It's known as ARP poisoning, and it points to malware spying on your network. But it isn't likely. More often, it's your ISP that's causing the issue. If you're using a router from your provider, it's likely in need of updating, or it's misconfigured. 

Can a VPN Fool Others About My Location?

VPN

Episode 1792

Nolan from Los Angeles, CA

Nolan wants to know if he can use a VPN to make networks think he's somewhere else. Leo says yes, that's pretty much what the VPN does. Some people use VPNs to stream other countries' video streams for that very reason. VPNs have a client and a server. The client goes on the users' PC, while the server is somewhere else. Users then log into the VPN, and the IP address will be wherever they connect to it. But there is a catch. VPN providers use a pool of IP addresses that they own, and they identify them as VPN addresses.

How Can I Assign IP Addresses to Everything on My Home Network?

IP Address

Episode 1784

Mark from Studio City, CA

Mark's home wifi modem has run out of ethernet ports. So he bought a five port gigabit switch, but nothing really works. Leo says that everything has to have a unique IP address, so a switch won't work. You need a router, which will assign unique addresses to everything you need to plug into your network. Connect the switch to the router's ethernet port, and then the router will assign the IPs as needed. 

How Do I Connect My HDHomeRun to My Mesh Router?

HDHomeRun

Episode 1715

Johnny from Atlanta, GA

Johnny has an Eero mesh router and is attaching his HD HomeRun DVR to his network through powerline networking. Will he have issues with configuring it? Leo says that the HDHomeRun software should do it automatically. But if he's doing it manually, he can go into Eero settings under devices and see the IP addresses of each device. But the HDHomeRun has automatic discovery. It should connect to the network on its own with no manual entering. 

How can YouTube know I'm using a VPN?

ExpressVPN (Sponsor of the TWiT Network)

Episode 1712

Al from New Mexico

Al says that YouTube TV won't let him use a VPN now. Leo says that's because they want to know your location. But how do they know he's using a VPN? Leo says that there's no perfect way to detect a VPN, but if it's being done by a known IP address, that tells the tale. So Google knows what IP address VPN servers are using and some VPNs aren't good at masking it. Try another server or service that rotates IP addresses. Leo uses ExpressVPN (a sponsor of the TWiT Network).

How can I tell YouTube I'm not where it thinks I am?

YouTube

Episode 1629

Gary from Cheektowaga, New York

Gary uses TMobile's home service for $50 a month. Speeds fluctuate from 25-115 MBps. Leo says that's pretty usable. Gary likes YouTube TV, but TMobile thinks he's in another city, and so he can't get local TV. Leo says that's the problem with mobile-based internet. It's based on where your IP is located. It's a universal problem because people trust geo-located IP and it's never accurate. Leo says that there may be a way by contacting YouTube.

​Doctor Mom says that YouTube now has a page where you can tell YouTube TV where you are.

Why can't I navigate to my own IP in my VPN?

ExpressVPN

Episode 1620

Brett from Fort Worth, Texas

Brett has moved to ExpressVPN, but he's having issues surfing to his own IP. It worked fine with his old VPN, but not ExpressVPN (who is a sponsor of the TWiT Network). What can he do? Leo says to check your router settings. It may be that in your devices, there could be a security issue that's blocking it. Leo does that with his network for his NAS. Leo also says that Brett's problem may be due to his previous VPN being less secure. 

How do I Configure a Wireless Printer?

Eero

Episode 1618

Neal from Phoenix, AZ

Neal has a cheap Samsung laser printer that he used wirelessly connected to his ASUS router. But it would only work in the less secure WEP. He would disconnect it when he didn't use it. But now, he's picked up an Eero Mesh router and it doesn't support WEP. It's configurable through an internet interface, but how does he do that?  Leo says that to connect, just enter the IP address in the browser in the desktop. Even an iPad will be able to do it. Then he should be able to connect to it and enter the wifi access point, name, and password. It should then open up the printer interface.