home theater

How Can I Adjust Audio Sync On TV While Streaming?

DisplayLag

Episode 1731

Bruce from Glendale, CA

Bruce is having issues with audio sync on his TV and home theater/DVD player. Leo says that sync is often built-in and should be in the settings for the device. Bruce gave up on his FireStick. Leo says that a lot of people have. There are some tricks like turning off encoding (or on). Look at the TV settings as well. Maybe a better HDMI cable would help. 

From the chatroom - check the manual for AV Sync. https://www.sony.com/electronics/support/articles/00012347

Scott Wilkinson ... Paying for it

Scott Wilkinson

Episode 1731

Scott joins Leo to talk about streaming. Leo recently wired his streaming box with Cat6 Ethernet to get a much more consistent stream, and it made a huge difference. Scott agrees and says that Ethernet doesn't really have distance limitations like WiFi can. Some thing ethernet will only last up to 50 feet, but Scott says that isn't true, per se. It really comes down to your bandwidth, the kind of ethernet cable you have, etc. Ultimately, you can get up to a gigabit of bandwidth up to 120 feet with Cat6 Ethernet, and that's plenty for most people's needs.

 

Why is my audio video signal dropping out on my TIVO?

Tivo Edge

Episode 1730

Bruce from Las Vegas, NV

Bruce is having issues with his TV that the audio gets out of sync and the video goes blank on his TIVO Edge. Leo says it's losing HDMI sync when you run it through the AV receiver. And it's likely the AV Receiver that's causing it since Bruce isn't having issues connecting through his Xbox or directly. Is there a setting he needs to look for in his AVR? Look in the settings for eliminating the sync handshake. That's what's dropping out. If you can make it always on, it would never have to lose the handshake. Leo also suspects a new HDMI cable may solve the problem.

Scott Wilkinson ...and the third number

Scott Wilkinson

Episode 1727

Scott is back to talk about a listener question that could affect all of us. He's been looking at the Denon AVRX4700, and it's supposed to have Dolby 5.1.4 or 7.1.2. What's the third digit for? Scott says that the third digit tells you how many speakers you can use overhead. It's a Dolby Atmos at Home Specs.The first mask is the number of surround speakers you can have, the middle number is the subwoofer. But if you want an Atmos system, the third number is the one you want to pay attention to.

Scott Wilkinson ... Amplified and Converted

Scott

Episode 1723

Scott joins Leo to talk about the Helm Audio DB12 AAA pocket headphone amp. It uses THX amplifier technology. Noise measurements are far lower in total harmonic distortion than any chip-based amp. And while the price of the DB12AAA is $200, it does make a huge difference in audio from a mobile device. But since mobile phones have eliminated the headphone jack in favor of Bluetooth headphones, users would need an adapter to use it.

Scott Wilkinson ...Critically Conversed

Scott Wilkinson

Episode 1721

Scott joins Leo to talk about the latest wave of virtual trade shows and conventions that have caught on in 2020. Even the political conventions have caught on to this. The benefits are that you can watch the keynotes, sessions, and other conference opportunities when you want, and you don't catch COVID. The downside is the human interaction is limited. Check out his Interview on NET Critical Conversations here.

Is it safe to leave my soundbar on?

Samsung HW-Q60T Soundbar

Episode 1720

Rob from Sylmar, CA

Rob is having an issue with his new Samsung Soundbar and TV. They aren't really compatible. The TV remote can turn on the soundbar, but not turn it off. And the documentation is pretty bad. Leo says that Samsung doesn't expect you to turn off the soundbar at all since it will eventually time itself off. You could try resetting the soundbar back to factory settings and then set it up again. Then leave it on and don't worry about it. 

Scott Wilkinson ... Tech-splained

Episode 1715

Scott joins Leo to talk about a big announcement in Home Theater. Scott wrote an article this week about the different technologies behind today's digital home theater, digital cinema, and education projectors. The three technologies include LCD, LCOS, and DLP. All three work roughly the same way with 1" screens with micropic pixels. Those screens are then projected through lenses onto the screen. LCOS tends to be more expensive than LCD or one chip DLP projectors.