headphones

Why Are My Bluetooth EarPods Breaking Up?

Bluetooth

Episode 1834

John from Webster City, IA

John has problems with his Bluetooth earbuds breaking up when he's outside. He's tried more than one model and it still happens. But when they're inside, they play just fine. Leo says that Bluetooth is a frustrating art form that Apple has tied us to, so they can make money selling Bluetooth headphones. Now everyone is doing it: drives him nuts. It's likely interference. More expensive models usually have better reception, so it may just be a case of you get what you pay for. OneMore makes a pair that wires both pods together.

Scott Wilkinson ... a little compressed

Scott Wilkinson

Episode 1825

Scott joins Leo to talk about the new AptX lossless high-resolution Bluetooth standard that was announced this week. Scott adds that while it does have a little compression, the AptX developers state they can recover the original quality of the sound. But it's not really high resolution. As for headphones, Scott uses OneMore's Stylish Bluetooth headphones. They sound great. But when he really wants to hear high-resolution audio, he sticks to wired headphones. 

But don't expect Aptx on your iPhone any time soon. They use Apple lossless, AAC over Bluetooth. 

Scott Wilkinson, HiFi Hipster

Scott Wilkinson

Episode 1819

Scott joins Leo to talk about Audeze Electro Static Headphones, which uses planar magnetics for an open, airy sound. But they aren't cheap at $4500. Oh, and you also have to buy a special pro bias amplifier as well. So expect to drop over $5K. Which is a lot cheaper than Sennheiser's $60 thousand cans! They were initially developed for patients who had to have MRIs, to keep them calm. Now the technology is consumer-grade and hopefully, the price will come down soon.

Scott says they sound amazing.

Is There a Microphone That Can Connect to My Headphones?

Giveet Bluetooth 5.0 Transmitter Receiver

Episode 1803

Jim from Winnetka, CA

Jim is hard of hearing and would like to know if there's an app or something that will enable him to boost his hearing aids or use bone-conducting headphones to hear. Leo says that there are in the iPhone. The iPhone will route sound to your hearing aids if they are modern. But if you want to use bone-conducting headphones, then you'll end up with some lag via Bluetooth. There's no lag with hearing aids because they use RF Radio technology and not Bluetooth. But if you need Bluetooth, then there are various wireless microphones that can do what Jim needs.

What Tablet Should I Buy for Travel?

iPad Pro

Episode 1801

Kevin from Ontario, CA

Kevin just bought an Apple Watch. Should he have waited until after next week's event? Leo says no, Kevin is safe. The next Apple Watch won't be out until the fall. 

Kevin also works for cruise lines as a comedy performer and he travels a lot.  He wants to know what's the best tablet for watching movies. Leo says the iPad, hands down. The 12.9" iPad Pro has the best screen with miniLED. Better than most TVs. Get the Apple surround sound headphones!

How Can I Listen to My TV With Headphones?

LG TV

Episode 1788

Joe from Marlborough, NJ

Joe would like to connect a pair of headphones to his LG TV. But when he does, the volume is very faint. Does he need some sort of amplifier? Leo says that most TVs get their audio from HDMI and the Audio Return Channel. If Joe has a home theater system or AV receiver, it's better to plug into that instead of the TV. What Leo thinks is maybe Joe needs to enable the setting in the TV menu. There are headphone amplifiers. Check out headphones.com for suggestions on which to get. There's plenty of options out there.

Scott Wilkinson: Ready to Party

Scott Wilkinson

Episode 1780

Scott joins Leo to talk about a new pair of headphones he's been reviewing. The great thing about a good pair of headphones is that they take the room's acoustics completely out of the music experience. This pair is called the Focal Clear MG headphones. They're an open-back design, which allows the back wave sound to escape into the room without sacrificing sound quality. Scott says this provides for a neutral tonal value, and the sound is a bit creamier and brighter.