ftp

How Can I Backup My Network Hard Drives?

Seagate

Episode 1772

Martin from Hayward, WI

Martin wants to know what is a good backup strategy for his Seagate hard drives and how can he mount them as network drives. Leo says that Seagate has its own backup in the cloud, which figures out where all the drives are. But that's not the only way to do it. FTP can work with a sync program. Robocopy wasn't designed for it, but it may be able to. The key is to figure out what the IP address is on the fly since most are dynamic. If he had a static IP, it wouldn't be a problem. The key is to find a sync program that supports FTP, but FTP isn't secure either. SCP is where it's at.

How Can I Create my Own Hosting Site That Only I Can Access With My Phone?

Raspberry Pi

Episode 1573

Jon from Indianapolis, Indiana

Gary wants to know if he can use a Raspberry Pi to host his own web site. Leo says that's a great idea. If he installs an FTP program, how can he get that to talk to his Apache server? Leo says this isn't ideal for a public site because of upload speeds and terms of service with the ISP. But if it's a personal file server that he can access for the web, that's legitimate. He also has to punch holes in his router firewall to get it, and that means to be sure his Pi is secure and up-to-date. Leo also recommends using Secure FTP to keep his system secure, and set port forwarding to Port 80.

What to Do if Your Only Browser Isn't Working

You may find yourself in a sort of "catch-22" if the only browser on your system won't work. If the browser keeps crashing upon launch, you can't really do anything to fix it, and in order to get an alternative browser you'd need to download it -- using a browser. Here are a few things you can try to fix your current browser, and there's even an alternative way to obtain a different browser without using a browser:

How can I transfer large video files to the cloud from overseas?

Episode 921

Tim from Los Angeles, CA

Leo says that with video, he'll have big files and he'll want to transfer them as fast as possible. He could use remote desktop, but it has a lot of overhead. Leo recommends using a Secure File Transfer Protocol (FTP) or Secure Copy Protocol (SCP). It'll be faster and more secure, and he'll have less issues with drop outs. OSX has a command line FTP built in, but there's also a good application called Transmit that will do it really well. It's as easy as dragging the file onto the icon.