FCC

FCC Promises to Investigate ISP's Buffering

Episode 1092

If you're a Netflix customer using Verizon FiOS or DSL, you may have noticed a message being displayed when video streaming slows down. The message blames Verizon's network congestion for the video buffering. Netflix has been confirming that the issue is with Verizon by checking with other Verizon customers. Verizon sent Netflix a cease and desist letter saying that if they don't stop doing this, they will sue.

Voice Your Net Neutrality Concerns to the FCC

FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler has proposed rules that threaten the free an open internet that we enjoy today. Under the new rules, content providers would have to pay for premium access to customers. Larger companies such as Hulu, Netflix, YouTube, and Amazon would be able to pay these access fees. But smaller startups or individuals with little funding would not be able to afford this, and would be at a competitive disadvantage. The internet is full of innovations that started as small startups with little funding, like Facebook, eBay, Yahoo, and even Google.

Could the FCC's new Net Neutrality rules affect gaming?

Episode 1079

Rusty from Los Angeles, CA

Rusty makes video games and he's concerned with the FCC's new Net Neutrality rules. Leo says that the FCC is now taking public comments via email at openinternet@fcc.gov. Leo says that latency through buffering would kill video gaming, as players would be too frustrated with it. So a free and open internet would be vital for gaming. The big guys would be able to pay for unhindered access, but the individual developers won't be able to. Innovation doesn't work that way.

FCC Proposes New Rules That Would Kill Net Neutrality

FCC

Episode 1078

This week, the FCC proposed new rules that would allow companies to pay for better access to customers. What's even more shocking and disappointing is that Tom Wheeler, the chairman of the FCC, is a former chairman of companies in both the cable and wireless industries. Even though he says "we still believe in an open Internet," Leo says it's a bald face lie. These rules, Leo says, will gut the FCC's ability to protect an open Internet.