computer security

Did I download a virus from an app?

Amazon Kindle Fire

Episode 1702

RIchard from Windsor, CA

Richard put Facebook Messenger onto his wife's Kindle tablet. Since then, he's had nothing but trouble with his network. He didn't get it from the Kindle store, so he's worried he's been hacked. Leo says that Richard probably was since he googled and clicked on the first link he found. Leo says that's why its important to go to the official source like the Kindle app store. If bad guys can steer you to a website, they can infect you. But it may not be the Kindle that's been infected. It could be the router or modem. But Leo says it's not likely.

Is my computer safe with Windows Defender?

Windows Defender

Episode 1653

Dave from Crystal River, FL

Dave has a Windows 10 PC running Windows Defender as his antivirus. Is that a good idea? Leo says yes. Defender does everything you need it to do, as long as you keep it updated. But AVS software can also give you a false sense of security. The last line of defense is your online behavior. That means avoiding clicking on links or opening attachments.

Teen Hacker Discovers Flaw in Educational Software

Black Hat Hackers Logo

Episode 1617

A teenage hacker discovered flaws in his school's educational Blackboard software and presented his findings with the eye of improving security. He made a presentation at the Black Hat Hackers convention in Las Vegas. But while he could have changed his grades, he opted not so. But he did break into a college network to change his admissions status to "accepted" to make a point. And while the software company lauded the teen for discovering the flaws, he was suspended at school.

Should I Renew McAfee Anti Virus?

mcafee

Episode 1580

Fred from Fontana, CA

Fred is trying to import his contacts and calendars and gets a single PST file that he can't import. Leo says he can choose several different formats, including CSV. Fred also has a Dell computer and his free trial of McAfee has expired. Leo says GOOD! Get rid of it and use Windows Defender. It's one of the best AVS out there, and it comes free with Windows 10. You don't need anything else. 

Facebook Stored Millions of Passwords in a Simple Text File

Facebook

Episode 1576

Facebook admitted that for years, they have been storing up to 600 million member passwords in a single text file that was unencrypted.  The text file was also searchable by thousands of Facebook employees. Facebook claims nobody had abused the ability and will notify users if their accounts are compromised. So you may want to change your password anyway.

Is Linux secure?

Linux Penguin

Episode 1462

Ted from Louisiana

Ted put Linux on an old Vista Machine, but when he went to use the app Turbo Tax online, it said that it wouldn't support Linux. Leo says to try the Chromium browser in Linux. It's more open source. But being a standard web app, it should work regardless. Is it secure? Leo says it is, but it's not 100% flawless. It does have the benefit of being obscure, though. Hackers want to go after the most people, and open source is such a small segment that it's relatively off their radar. Certainly more secure than Windows Vista.

Is my Mac infected with malware?

MacBook Pro

Episode 1457

Brad from Wells, NV

Brad accidentally downloaded some malware, but he can't find it to remove it. Leo says downloading a file is only half the equation. He then would have to run it. Since he can't find it, even in his download log, it's likely it was a failed download. On top of that, Brad runs a Mac, so he's even more secure than Windows. But he should always make sure he keeps his computer updated, just in case.

Kasperky AntiVirus Now owned by Russian Security Services

Episode 1457

Kasperky AntiVirus was caught in the middle of a battle between the company's owners, and the Russian Security Services government agency. The company lost and now the Russians are now in charge of the Kaspersky Security Network. Leo says that he hasn't recommended Kaspersky for awhile now and even the US Federal Government recommends not using it because of the potential for spying. But it's more than a potential espionage tool, as there's a hole in the Kaspersky Network that would allow an employee of the company, or a hacker to snoop into your system.