Chromecast

Why Can’t I See My Media Devices on My WiFi Network?

Google Home

Episode 1828

Victor from Columbia, SC

David can't see his Google Home device and his Chromecast on his wifi network. Leo says if you're on the same network, and can see both, you should be able to see them. But Google Home uses Bluetooth to signal its presence online, so you have to turn on Bluetooth in order to see it, along with WiFi. You don't have to join it, but you do have to turn it on. You also have to look for Load Media Router Component Extension. Here's a how to, from ScooterX.

Can I Cast to My TV From My Cell Phone Without WiFi?

SmartView

Episode 1819

WD from Hell's Kitchen, NY

WD would like to cut the cord, but he doesn't want to pay extra for the internet as well. Leo says that's what ISPs will do. If he has a cable provider also handling internet access, they'll just make up for the cord-cutting by jacking up the rate on internet access. Can he cast to his SmartTV and just use his mobile data plan? Leo says it depends on what his cellular carrier provides. Most will have data caps, but if he doesn't do it all the time, he can "cast" it. It's called DNLA, or Miracast. Samsung can do it if both TV and mobile phone are Samsung. It's called SmartView.

Why Do Streaming Sticks Overheat?

Roku TV Stick

Episode 1814

Steven from Tustin, CA

Steven is suddenly getting a warning on his TV that his Roku Stick is getting too warm and could shut down. He unplugged it and cooled it down, and has now added an extender to keep its distance. Leo says that he stopped using the Roku stick because they tend to overheat and crash. It's the same with the FireTV Stick and others. They overheat normally, and that's not good for electronics. Using an extender is a good idea, but Leo prefers using the stand-alone Roku Ultra 4K box.  If you like a stick though, the Google Chromecast is the way to go.

How Can I Make a Video Wall in My House?

Raspberry Pi

Episode 1811

Steve from Los Angeles, CA

Steve wants to use TV screens to create a large screen photo gallery in his home. Leo says he could use a Chromecast or Apple TV for each TV screen and stream photos from Google Photos. He would also want to join all screens together for one big picture. Leo says that could be a bigger challenge because each TV has to join with the other. A Raspberry Pi could perhaps do it, but you'd have to write custom code to be able to create a Video Wall Mosaic.

How Can I Use My Chromecast Without WiFi?

Chromecast

Episode 1807

Gary from California

Gary watches live sports on the Peacock app, casting to his TV from the Chromecast. But he wants to be able to do it on his boat. Leo says you need WiFi to do that, as both devices have to be on the same network. He also hears he can create his own wifi using a router and connecting to an antenna on the hill. Leo says it's probably a hotspot that will enable you to connect to it.

How Can I Better Control Audio in Google Meet for My Kid's Distance Learning Class?

google meet

Episode 1768

Jessica from Gorham, ME

Jessica is trying to teach some students at home and some in the classroom at the same time. What she's been doing is treating all students as being at home, so they are all logged into Google Meetings. But the problem is, that kids keep forgetting to mute their mics and the feedback is driving her crazy. She would also like to project all the home kids onto the screen so the kids in the classroom can see them.

How can I route audio from my Chromecast to my stereo?

JTech Digital Interface

Episode 1734

Michael from Torrance, CA

Michael uses a Chromebook in the garage for working out. But the video is rather janky. So he added a Chromecast and a video monitor. The Video is improved, but he doesn't want separate audio output.  Leo says the HDMI carries both audio and video, but you can split it into a stereo. Leo adds though, that it can be tricky because you'd need a powered speaker to do it. Michael is currently using a headphone jack connected to computer speakers. Not really optimal.