Cat6 Ethernet

Should I Wire My Home for Ethernet?

TWIG

Episode 1733

Frin from Phoenix, AZ

Frank has been watching Leo's podcast This Week in Google (TWIG), where he talked about wiring his home with Cat6 Ethernet. Everything is wired for better streaming and no congestion. It also included home theater equipment called "Araknis" which enables a tech person to dial in and fix anything wrong or set it up. Leo wasn't a fan because he never got credentials to do it himself. So, he had it removed in favor of Ubiquity's Unify system. It works great.

Frank was thinking about getting the Araknis though. Leo says it's expensive. Leo recommends the Ubiquity UDM Pro. 

Should I wire my house with ethernet?

eero Mesh Router

Episode 1728

Vip from Monument, CO

Vip wants to know if he should wire his home with ethernet cable while he has the walls open. Leo says ABSOLUTELY. And use Cat6 while you're at it to future proof it. Hardwired is always preferable to WiFi and it'll be faster, have far fewer dropouts, and no congestion. Leo just did it himself. We're lifting a lot more data now with WiFi and IoT smart devices. There's a lot of congestion. 

If you have a challenging wifi environment and can't afford to wire your home, Leo advises going with a Mesh router: eero, Netgear's Ubiquity, even Asus has gone mesh.

How can I hardwire my computer to my network for gaming?

Ethernet Cable

Episode 1343

Marion from Pasadena, CA

Marion's sister is heavily into gaming and wants to hardwire her PC to the network to get better gaming performance. Leo says that hardwiring is always going to be a bit faster than Wi-Fi because of wireless congestion. Leo says ideally, the best way to do this is to lay conduit from room to room and snake CAT6 ethernet all over the house. That requires opening the wall and is usually best when building a home. She also may need a switcher to handle the traffic around the house.

How can I extend the range of my video signal?

Episode 1234

Steve from Chino Hills, CA

Steve has a Security Camera DVR and he's used a splitter to watch it in several rooms using a balun, but he keeps losing the signal. Leo says that HDMI doesn't throw very far, and using a balun amplifies the signal and sends it over ethernet to the other side. The distance is still limited to around 200' and it could be that he's at the extreme edge of the range. Steve could go RF. The chat room says that using Cat6 Ethernet cables could make it that far, and at MonoPrice.com he could get an extender kit to around 328 feet.