bitlocker

Where is the certificate for an encrypted file?

Episode 1279

Yogi from Belmont Shores, CA

Yogi wants to know about file encryption. He encrypted a file and then wanted to take the key off and put it on a USB key, but he can't find it. Leo says that the certificate is the key. If he can find the certificate, he can copy it. If he were to copy the file without the certificate, no one would be able to get to that file. The idea is that he's encrypting the file so that it can't be opened by anyone who isn't himself, and the way he can prove his identity in this case is by logging into his system. Someone would have to have both his login and the password to access that file.

Why can't I turn on automatic encryption on my Windows PC?

Episode 1206

Mark from Los Angeles, CA

Mark is having trouble encrypting his hard drive in Windows 8.1. He's told it's encrypted by default, but Leo says if he can't get it turned on, then his hardware probably doesn't support it. Mark should look for TPM 2.0 support. Users also need support for Windows connected standby feature. So if he doesn't have all that, he'll have to get a third party encryption utility. TrueCrypt is free and open source, but unfortunately, they've given the government a back door.

Is there an alternative to TrueCrypt?

Episode 1100

John from New Jersey

John wants to know if there's a cross platform alternative to TrueCrypt since development of it ended. Leo says that BitLocker is Microsoft's file vault, and Apple's is called FileVault. Both work great, but they aren't cross platform. Leo says that TrueCrypt is still around, but that the writer of it allegedly took to the Internet and said it wasn't safe anymore. It's been audited and so far seems to still be legit. So who knows? Leo doesn't know of any open source options anymore. BitLocker is a good alternative.