4K

Why Doesn't My 4K Smart TV Stream in 4K?

Roku

Episode 1817

Jose from Modesto, CA

Jorge has a 4K SmartTV, but when he streams YouTube on it, it's not in 4K. What gives? Leo says to make sure the YouTube app on the TV is capable of streaming in 4K. It's likely the app isn't 4K capable. What Leo recommends is to use the Roku 4K streaming device. Let it do the streaming. That way, the 4K processing will be handled by the Roku device. Also, YouTube TV charges $20 more a month for 4K streaming. So if he doesn't have that subscription, he won't be streaming in 4K. 

Can I Just Swap Out My TV in My Home Theater?

Samsung QNED QN65Q

Episode 1815

Laura from Goldendale, WA

Laura has a 17x20 living room with a 10-year-old TV that she wants to replace. What size should she get? She's looking at the Samsung QLED QN65Q. Will her speakers be plug-in-play to support them? Leo says yes. Whatever sources they have in the receiver will be supported. She just wants to be sure to plug the HDMI cable into the port that says "ARC." That's the Audio Return Channel, and it'll keep the audio in sync. If the TV doesn't support ARC, then she needs to opt for the optical connection, and some TVs are dropping that. If that's the case, she may need a new AVR. 

Scott Wilkinson ... Totally Hip

Scott Wilkinson

Episode 1813

Scott joins Leo to talk about how to watch the Tokyo Olympics. This year, you can watch the games in 8K in Tokyo (though it's upconverted from 1080p), or if you have Comcast, you can watch it in 4K HDR through Xfinity, as well as through the NBCSports app. But only if your cable provider is a part of their network. YouTubeTV is also offering live streaming the games in 4K HDR, but you have to pay an extra $20 a month for the privilege after a free 30-day trial.  So you can do the trial, watch the games, and then cancel. Others, including NBC, are broadcasting in 1080p.

Try to Avoid Using OLED as a Computer Monitor

Jeff, a listener from San Francisco, advises to not choose an OLED display for use as a computer monitor. Burn-in can be a scary issue when it comes to modern computer interfaces, which often leave menus/images still for long periods of time. It can be replaced under warranty if one is lucky, but maybe go for a 4K LCD display instead. Preferably a big screen that can be utilized as a 4-in-1 canvas for multiple windows.

Why Isn't My 4k Roku Streaming in 4k?

Roku Ultra

Episode 1759

Jose from Modesto, CA

Jose got a new 4K TV and a Roku Ultra. But the Roku Ultra is getting an error for resolution. Leo says Jose needs an HDMI 2.1 cable to support the 4K stream.  You don't need a monster cable or anything like that. Just one that's HDMI 2.1 compatible. Leo recommends MonoPrice.com. It's around $12.

But shouldn't the cable that came with the Roku be compatible? Leo says it should be. Try resetting the Ultra and see if it has the latest firmware. If the problem persists, then it's likely a bad Roku unit, and you should take it back and exchange it for another one. 

Replacing Vs. Repairing Your TV

If your home television is not working anymore, you may question whether to buy a new screen or call up the classic "TV Repairmen" (a lost art). While the fix might be easy with a little digging, anything complex may cost way too much or be too troublesome to get repaired. Televisions are pretty inexpensive these days so a good approach is to find great deals on a quality TV. A good, relatively cheap brand is TCL, though Samsung, Hisense, and LG are also reliable. Just don't hang the Television over a fireplace!

Scott Wilkinson ... Upscaled

Scott Wilkinson

Episode 1739

Scott joins Leo to talk about this year's World Series, and how it's being streamed in 4K HDR. But it isn't being shot in 4K. In fact, on Fox, it's still being broadcast in 720p. But it is being shot in 1080p HDR. The 1080p HDR raw video is being upscaled to 4K for the stream. You can get it on the Fox Sports App. But the 4K AppleTV may not give you HDR. So go with the Roku Ultra if you have it.

Also, previous games are not streamed in 4K HDR, only the live stream.

Scott Wilkinson ... Revoked

Scott Wilkinson

Episode 1693

Scott joins Leo and chimes in on a court case over whether people actually "own" the DVDs and digital media that they buy. In the fine print, it says that you don't really own your media, you own a license to play that media, which can be revoked at any time. But Leo says that physical media is an actual thing you own and can hand down to your heirs. Scott agrees and believes that's why physical media continues to hang on. People like to own things. The other advantage of digital media is that it can be transferred from one media format to another.

Should I Upgrade My Blu-Ray Discs to 4k?

Blu-ray

Episode 1693

Tom from California

Tom wants to know how much better 4K Blu-Ray is over standard blu-ray. Should he upgrade? Leo says that 4K is 4 times more resolution than standard Blu-ray, but the big difference is the higher dynamic range (HDR). The colors are bolder, the blacks are blacker, and viewers can see more detail in extreme brightness and low light. But everything in the chain has to support 4K. The TV, the cables, the player. But Leo believes we're finally at the end of the road for physical media. So if anyone wants to upgrade to 4K for one last copy, do it because they want the HDR upgrade.

What TV Should I Buy?

TCL

Episode 1691

Charles from Virginia Beach, VA

Charles wants to get a new TV. But he's confused. LED. LCD. OLED? Leo says there are really only two technologies OLED and LED. LEDs are less expensive and work better in bright ambient light. OLEDs are better image quality and color, but he will need to darken the room. Then there's resolution. Most TVs now are 4K. That translates to a sharper image and with HDR, there's bolder colors and better blacks. It also gives better detail in bright light or darker scenes. Leo recommends TCL, it has Roku built-in and they are very affordable. Another option is HiSense.