3D

Scott Wilkinson ... More about Gemini Man

Scott Wilkinson

Episode 1634

Scott went and saw Gemini Man this week and said the film was shot at 120 fps, five times more than traditional cinematic frame rates. This made the film very sharp and detailed, something that not everyone likes, but Scott does. Ang Lee also shot it in pure 3D at 4K resolution. The irony is, there are no theaters in the US that can show 4K 3D at 120p. So you have to decide what you want. 3D. 4K. or 120p (2K). Scott says to see it in 120p if you can. There are 14 theaters around the country showing that option.

Scott Wilkinson .... Gemini Man

Scott Wilkinson

Episode 1632

Next week, Scott is going to see Ang Lee's new movie Gemini Man, starring Will Smith. It's salient because Lee has shot it at 120 fps 3D and in IMAX. High frame rate has also created a debate in the film community about just how realistic an image should look and still be considered "cinema." It's also shot in 3D, which Scott says hasn't really been popular lately. Then on top of that, Will Smith is battling a younger version of himself, where the actor was de-aged. He'll join Leo next week with his review.

Scott Wilkinson on Home Theater

Scott Wilkinson

Episode 1335

Scott saw Billy Lynn's Long Halftime Walk, directed by Ang Lee, which was shot in 3D HFR at 120fps. The problem with shooting at that high frame rate is that few theaters can display it. Scott says that Lee is trying to push the boundaries of cinema with a new visual language that breaks the barriers up by 24 fps to save film stock. The problem is there's few projectors that can handle that amount of data. Scott says it's gorgeous, and very compelling. Shooting at that frame rate also meant not being able to wear makeup. Required more of a method acting technique, and more.

What computer should I get for video editing and 3D rendering?

Episode 1299

Doug from Sacramento, CA

Doug has been taking a lot video classes with Adobe Premiere and After Effects, but his HP computer performance isn't all that great. Leo says that when you buy a computer at Costco you're not going to get a pro-grade device. If Doug is being slowed down by rendering, he'll not only want a lot of RAM, but he should also put in an SSD. A good NVidia or ATI Radeon video card will give him a fast GPU to handle the rendering instead of his PC's processor. That's what Premiere relies on -- the GPU.

Scott Wilkinson on Home Theater

Scott Wilkinson

Episode 1281

Scott is back from NAB and he went early to attend the "Future of Cinema" conference. He saw a film by Ang Lee that was shot in native 3D on a pair of Sony F65 Cinema Cameras at 120fps. 5 times more than standard 24p. Scott says that for showcasing the film in conventional theaters at 120 fps, they will have to project it in 2K. Some say it looks like video, not a movie. But Scott says that's because we're so used to the way it's looked for the last 100 years. Now that we have better technology, we should keep moving forward. And theaters can always down shift the frame rate.

Scott Wilkinson

Scott Wilkinson

Episode 1185

Scott spend the week watching Avengers: Age of Ultron in various versions, including 3D and laser projected. He's coming around to Leo's point of view that 3D just isn't that great a format. Laser projection, by contrast, gives you a brighter image, and when it's Laser 3D, it works quite well unless you wear prescription glasses, where the polished inner surface bounces light around and the reflection is quite distracting. So he's quickly starting to see Leo's point. Leo likes the idea of immersion, and the more realistic a movie the better.

Scott Wilkinson

Scott Wilkinson

Episode 1059

Scott is back with questions about how 4K will affect 3D and what glasses would be best. Sony uses both, but Samsung and LG both use passive technology. Vizio went with the passive glasses in 2013, but this year they dumped 3D altogether. Scott says he likes passive glasses because they're lighter and the TVs are more affordable. Passive is brighter, but even then it only lets in 50% of the light. Active glasses lets in only 30% of the light, and you have to recharge them or change the batteries. Scott also says the one good thing is that 4K offers 1080p in each eye for 3D.