Audience Questions

Audience QuestionsHour 1

Hour 1 Hour 2 Hour 3
Watch Daisy from Huntington Beach, CA Comments

Daisy is a teacher, who is now doing distance learning with her kids and she's having issues logging into her district Gmail account. She gets a google sign-in page that opens when she goes to Google Hangouts. She now can't get into her account. Leo suspects that is a phony phishing scam that has gotten her credentials and then locked her out. Leo suggests contacting the district IT office and have the password reset and 2-factor authentication set up so that it won't happen again. 

But it could also be a corrupted cookie. So Leo says to clear the browser cache of the cookies. She can even just delete all the google ones and leave the rest alone. That should prompt her to re-sign in. If it works, it was just a corrupted file. But if it doesn't, the account may have been compromised. 

Audience QuestionsHour 2

Hour 1 Hour 2 Hour 3
Watch Larry from Petaluma, CA Comments

Larry is trying to pair his new Samsung 55" QLED with his Denon AV. He finally got that working, but he's having an issue with headaches. Leo says that flickering may cause the issue and he recommends adjusting the frame interpolation (called Action Motion Plus in Samsungs) and see if by adjusting the refresh rate up or down will solve that issue. Most likely, going as high as he can will fix it. But he'll get that "soap opera" look. 

Caroline called in Hour 3 to say that she had a similar problem of headaches watching video on computers. She had a slight blue tint applied to her glasses lenses and that did the problem.

Tony called the next show to point out that he thinks Charlie may be suffering from a form of light blindness, where the LEDs are too bright on the new TV. LEDs can dim over time, and he was so used to his older TV, that the newer one's brighter LEDs are giving him a headache. And TVs are set to be very bright on the showroom floor. So adjusting the brightness could help.

Watch Jake from Denver, CO Comments

Jake has transitioned to a home office for his work. He has a three monitor setup for his laptop and docking station. He has another older computer that can only drive two of the monitors because it doesn't use USB-C. So he added a USB-C card. Still two monitors only. Leo says that Jake's video card is probably too old to drive all three video monitors. Are there any discreet graphics cards that can handle USB-C? Type-C can be USB 3.1 or Thunderbolt 3. Looks the same. So it can be confusing. 

Here's a list from the chatroom - https://uploadvr.com/every-virtuallink-gpu/.

Watch Kathy from Ventura, CA Comments

Kathy is thinking about getting an iMac Pro. Leo says that while it's super-fast, it's also ridiculously expensive. If she's not doing something extremely challenging like video gaming or editing multiple 4K streams, then she really doesn't need to spend all that money. These days, all computers are fast enough to do 95% of what we do. The real issue for Kathy is wanting to drive multiple monitors, but she can do that with a regular iMac. The 27" 3Ghz six-core 5K iMac has two Thunderbolt 3 ports, and you can always get an HDMI adapter.

Audience QuestionsHour 3

Hour 1 Hour 2 Hour 3
Watch Caroline from Victorville, CA Comments

Caroline had a similar problem of headaches watching video on computers. She had a slight blue tint applied to her glasses lenses and that solved the problem. Leo says she can even get special glasses online that have that tint built-in. Gunnar makes them.

Watch Carlo from Ontario, CA Comments

Carl bought a new Asus Mesh Router and he's worried about privacy since they also use Trend Micro drivers. Should he be concerned? Leo says there's always a risk, but Asus is a reputable company and if they made a deal with Trend Micro, they would mention it in their privacy statement. But he doubts that there's much if anything to worry about. There's too great a risk to lie about such things. 

Best settings? Leo says the first thing is to customize a password. Turn off WAN Administration. Turn off Universal Plug n Play (UPnP). Turn ON WPA2 Encryption. Especially WPA PSK. That will make sure all WiFi connections require a password. If it has WPA3, so much the better. Also, make sure to have the latest firmware.

 

Watch Matthew from Lake Arrowhead, CA Comments

Matthew says that he's been having issues with a used Apple MacBook laptop maintaining a charge. Leo says to change the battery. If that's an issue, then he can move to the charger itself, and they fail. If it's not the power adapter or the MagSafe, then look to the cords. Outside of that, it will point to the circuitry inside. He can download Apple's diagnostic software, it's been leaked online. But if there's something inside, Apple will require replacing the logic board, and that's nearly the cost of an entire computer. But at least take it into the Apple Store and pay for the diagnostic. They'll tell him what's wrong. He could also plug in the adapter without the battery and see if it powers on. 

Watch Dustin from South Africa Comments

Justin has a headset that starts to make a bunch of clicks after about an hour of use when he podcasts. Leo says he believes there's a faulty designed chipset out there that causes a memory that gets translated into a series of clicks. Leo recommends using an MAudio or Focus Rite Scarlet interface in between his headset and the computer. It will convert the analog to digital and it should fix it. If not, there's a memory leak that will require powering the devices down and then back up.

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