Tablets

iPad, Android, Kindle, or Windows tablets.

How can I add LTE to my tablet?

Cellular tower

Episode 1540

David from Florida

David has a tablet that he wants to add LTE internet access to. Can he do that? Leo says that it supports Wi-Fi, so he can use it with a MiFi card and connect that way. He can also hotspot with his mobile phone, depending on whether or not his carrier supports it. But he'll probably have to pay extra for that privilege. Leo also uses a Google Fi card with his tablet. They work in a lot of different devices.

Can iOS Live Up to the Power of the iPad Pro?

Apple iPad Pro

Episode 1540

Leo says that with its 8 core A12x Bionic Processor and 7 core GPU, the iPad Pro is indeed the computer of the future. It's more powerful than 92% of all laptops sold this year. But iOS is simply too underwhelming to take advantage of all that power. Things you should be able to do, like add an external hard drive or keyboard, you still can't. Sure, some creatives will be able to harness the power, but for most, you'll end up paying a ton of money for what amounts to an overpriced Netflix machine.

Can I do everything I need on the new iPad?

iPad Pro

Episode 1539

Evan from Phoenix, AZ

Evan bought the new iPad Pro and it's now his main computing device. He can do about 75% of what he needs to do on it, and the rest, he can just do on his laptop. Leo says that's the problem with it. It's doubling the cost of computing just to have one. And some of the workarounds that are required for simple tasks can be exhausting. Evan also says that the cost of being an Apple fan is really becoming prohibitive. Apple is raising the prices on everything from the iPad to the iPhone to the Apple Watch.

How should he charge it? Leo says the Anker chargers are fine.

Leo's Thoughts on the New iPad Pro

iPad Pro with Keyboard

Episode 1539

Leo got a 256GB iPad Pro this week, and Leo says the iPad Pro is a sexy piece of technology. It's so thin, they couldn't even put a headphone jack in it! But he also says that after buying the keyboard folio, the magnetic Apple Pencil 2, and the iPad itself, he was into it for over $1600. He also says it far surpasses a comparable laptop in many ways. It has the True Tone display, an adaptive Liquid Retina display, an eight core A12x Bionic chip which is 7nm small, the smallest processor ever, and 7 GPUs. It's incredibly fast. Faster than 92% of all laptops sold, according to Apple.

Is my iPad secure?

Apple iPad

Episode 1537

Dale from Palmdale, CA

Dale is worried that his older iPad isn't safe to use anymore since he's stuck at iOS 11. Leo says not to worry. The iPad is secure no matter the age. It's sandboxed and as long as Apple continues security updates, which it will, it's more secure than a desktop.

How can I use both Android and iOS apps?

Episode 1535

Mike from Barstow, CA

Mike would like to have an Android phone, but he needs to use one iPhone app. Leo says that in most cases, most big name apps are available on both platform. But unique apps, like a mixing board app, would probably be solely on one platform or the other. So in Mike's case, it's only available in iOS. All you can really do is pester the app developer to port the app to Android. You could get a low priced iPad for around $250-330 and dedicate it to that one use.

Google announces Pixel 3 XL, Slate and other products

Episode 1531

Google announced the Google Pixel 3 XL this week, and Leo says it feels great in the hand. It has also added wireless charging, which Leo says is the holy grail of mobile phones, and the three major manufactures now support it. Google also announced the Pixel Slate, a new tablet with Chrome OS. It can also run Android and Linux apps. There was also the Google Home Hub tablet. Surprisingly tiny, it has a screen and is designed to be your home's hub.

Why are the maps on my iPad so inaccurate?

Apple iPad

Episode 1530

Dave from Sarasota, FL

Dave loves to drive when he travels, but the most recent car he has doesn't have a CarPlay option. How can he use an iPad as a CarPlay alternative for maps? Leo says a Wi-Fi iPad doesn't have GPS and as such, the maps are going to be inaccurate. Wi-Fi does triangulation of Wi-Fi signals that it can read, whereas GPS uses location based on a triangulation of GPS signals and cellular towers, which is far more accurate. He'd be better off using an iPad that has LTE.