Gaming

Console gaming (XBOX, Playstation, Nintendo, etc) or PC gaming.

Could the FCC's new Net Neutrality rules affect gaming?

Rusty from Los Angeles, CA

Episode 1079

Rusty makes video games and he's concerned with the FCC's new Net Neutrality rules. Leo says that the FCC is now taking public comments via email at openinternet@fcc.gov. Leo says that latency through buffering would kill video gaming, as players would be too frustrated with it. So a free and open internet would be vital for gaming. The big guys would be able to pay for unhindered access, but the individual developers won't be able to. Innovation doesn't work that way.

Amazon Launches Fire TV

Episode 1071

Amazon Fire TV

Amazon announced Fire TV this week, a device that is positioned to compete with AppleTV and Roku. Leo says it pretty much does the same things, but for an extra $40, you can get a wireless game controller to play games on it. Leo says it's essentially a computer running an Android OS; a smartphone minus the screen. It runs a quad core Snapdragon processor with 2GB of RAM, and will play Android games. Apple and Roku plan to implement this as well, but Amazon beat them to the punch.

Flappy Bird Developer Takes Popular Free Game Down from App Stores

Episode 1055

Flappy Bird developer Dong Nguyen tweeted: "I am sorry 'Flappy Bird' users, 22 hours from now, I will take 'Flappy Bird' down. I cannot take this anymore." He also says it's not related to legal issues, and that he still makes games. Leo predicts this is a marketing ploy, and that he expects it to come back up in a week or so.

Game Creator of Flappy Bird Pulls Down App at Its Height

Episode 1056

Flappy Bird

Flappy Bird is a crazy, but simple game that users, including Leo, have become obsessed with. But after over 50 million downloads and making an estimated $50,000 a day on ads, the creator has pulled the app because "he can't take it anymore." Leo thinks it may be a PR stunt and that more will be coming. But meanwhile, there's a ton of Flappy Bird clones.

How secure is port forwarding for running a Minecraft server?

Thomas from Vancouver, BC CAN

Episode 1048

Thomas wants to host a Minecraft server for his friends. Is port forwarding secure? Port forwarding is where you tell the router to send traffic coming in from a specific port to a certain machine. This limits a little bit of the potential damage from opening up a server to the outside world, but it will ultimately depend on that Minecraft server to be secure. It's important that Thomas keeps his Minecraft server secure and up to date. If someone can figure out how to get around his network via the server, he could infect his network.

How will higher screen resolutions affect gaming in the future?

Anthony from Houston, TX

Episode 1047

Anthony is wondering what will happen for gaming with screens that are surpassing even the retina display resolutions. Leo says that the more resolution there is, the more power it will need to process it. So it makes sense that if there's four times more work, the computer will need more power to push it. Leo says that for gaming, from the perspective of the user, higher resolutions won't necessarily look any better. So it's likely that gaming will stay at 1080p for awhile.

How can I limit my child's internet usage?

Harry from Long Beach, CA

Episode 1045

Harry wants to know Leo's thoughts on parental controls on the Internet. Does he know about TimeBoss by Nice Kit? Leo says that TimeBoss is a great piece of software but he's stunned it's still around. It basically allows kids to earn time. But does it really help kids manage their time? As adults, we have to understand our kids are growing up in a different culture than we did. The internet is how they socialize, and how they learn. Minecraft is light years better than getting hooked on Candy Crush.

How can I keep my son from gaming on his laptop?

John from Newport Beach, CA

Episode 1042

John got his son a new laptop for Christmas and wants to know how he can restrict his game play on it. Leo says he wouldn't take that approach, and instead he would team him balance and moderation. There are ways to prevent applications from being installed, but then he could just find web-based games to play instead. Also, if he blocks it, it'll just make him want to do it more. There's also no perfect way to block these things, since anything can be bypassed. Kids are great at finding ways around these things as well.