wifi

How can I run a TV signal to another building?

Jim from Oxnard, CA

Episode 1284

Jim's church has an auxiliary building that's about 300 feet away and they'd like to create a connection in order to broadcast the church service when they need overflow seating. Leo says you can create a directional WiFi setup that will beam the service directly to the building without the need to deploy cable. Check out this article at RadioLabs.com. And it won't cost any more than running an HDMI cable or other system. And you'd want to use a Balun in that regard and run ethernet anyway.

How can I boost my Wi-Fi and 4G reception?

Dave from Carson City, NV

Episode 1264

Dave just bought an RV and he's looking for a booster for Wi-Fi and 4G Internet reception. Leo says truckers use Wi-Fi antennas and many have magnets. As for 4G, Leo says he won't really need one for that. It either works or it doesn't. And in areas of limited reception, the chatroom says that Weboost makes them for $200. It's essentially a 4G repeater.

How can I connect my Roku without a router?

Episode 1254

Gloria from Los Angeles, CA
Roku Stick

Gloria has a Roku Stick and she's been told she needs a router to use it. Leo says that yes, she'll need wireless internet access. If her router doesn't have Wi-Fi built-in, then her choices are to either get a regular Roku and plug it into her modem via an ethernet cable, or buy a router which will handle wireless traffic from the Roku stick. It'll also allow her to connect to her laptop wirelessly. Leo says that if she calls her cable provider, they'll replace her modem with a Wi-Fi modem/router. They'll set it all up.

What's the best way to wire my house for the Internet?

Ed from Chino Hills, CA

Episode 1254

Ed is building a house in a remote area. Should he install Cat 5e or Cat 6 cable? Leo says that the faster it is, the more expensive it is. It's about 30% faster with each level. So Leo says to future proof your home, buy the 5e, but he should put in conduit so he can replace it with faster cables down the line. It won't speed up internet access, it'll just speed delivery of data within the house. Most people will just be using Wi-Fi, though.

How can I protect myself on a public hotspot?

Doug from Alabama

Episode 1240

Doug does a lot of traveling on the road and he uses a open Wi-Fi hotspots a lot. He's worried about the security of using those hotspots, though. Leo says that using a Virtual Private Network (VPN) is a good solution, as it burrows a secure tunnel through the hotspot so that all of his data is encrypted. He'd be totally safe and secure. The downside though it that using a VPN will slow him down a lot, and they are a challenge for some to set up. And the reality is, more and more of what he'll be doing online is encrypted anyway.

Why is internet so slow on my desktop?

Episode 1224

Che from Orlando, FL
Dell XPS 8700

Che just bought a new Dell XPS Desktop and it's started to slow down drastically. He does a speed test, like Leo taught, and the desktop is much slower than his laptop. Leo says to try plugging the desktop directly into the router with an ethernet cable, and see if the speed improves. If so, then he's narrowed it down to the router. Leo says it could the hardware, but he could try reinstalling the Wi-Fi connection. There may also be conflicting Wi-Fi drivers at work between the hardware driver and the Windows driver. That can confuse Windows and slow things down.