uBlock Origin

Why do I get popups in my browser?

uBlock Origin

Episode 1466

Barb from Rancho Mirage, CA

Barb keeps getting a popup that says she needs to update her drivers, and it wants her to pay for it. Leo says that Barb is right to be suspicious about it. Drivers are free from the manufacturer. The popups come from the browser and websites can use that to try and get her to buy stuff. Chances are, her granddaughter went to a site triggered popups. Can she get rid of them? Leo says she can use a popup blocker in her browser to do it. It's in her browser settings.

Does a popup saying I'm infected mean I've been hacked?

uBlock Origin

Episode 1457

Jay from Long Beach, CA

Jay keeps getting a popup when surfing that says he's been infected with a virus. Should he be worried? Leo says no. Chances are, it's the website that has been hacked, and a piece of javascript has been put into that site. If he closes out the website, it simply goes away. It may also end up being some sort of extension that got installed in his browser. Jay should clear out all his extensions and it should solve it.

Block Online Ads Responsibly

Online ads have become increasingly pervasive and annoying over the years, so the effort to circumvent or block them entirely is no surprise. Some ads go as far as to completely obstruct content, and it can significantly slow down the responsiveness of the site as well. Some sites automatically start playing video and audio of ads or other content, which can interrupt something else you’re watching or listening to. It may seem like an obvious solution to install and run an ad blocker all the time, but this presents an ethical dilemma.

How can I block autoplay ads?

UBlock Origin

Episode 1452

Frank from Burbank, CA

Frank wants to know how he can filter out ads when he's on the internet. Especially when he's listening to music. Leo says that he has mixed emotions about blocking ads because he makes a living with ad supported content. But UBlock Origin is a good ad blocker. Leo says he should accept ads from sites he prefers. Another option is to block autoplay in Chrome. Just Google it, and he'll find a plugin to do it.

Block Malicious Content in Your Browser

Many websites on the internet use Javascript. In fact, it's often critical for websites to function at all — it's not optional. That being said, Javascript can be used maliciously to compromise your system, or simply use your computer to do things without your knowledge. For example, there are a lot of websites these days, such as CoinHive, that are making money by running a little bit of code on your computer with the purpose of generating cryptocurrency.