Tech news

Microsoft Sues Feds Over Rampant Encroachment to Privacy

Episode 1279

Microsoft campus

Saying that the federal government has demanded personal data of their customers over 2500 times this year, Microsoft has sued the federal government demanding that the court rule on how the company must provide the information. According to the complaint, Microsoft is not allowed to tell their customers of the action, nor is there any expiration on the demands, effectively tying up the company forever. Microsoft is asking the court to rule and provide a level of transparency, and to act as a hedge against an overreaching government.

Usage of Ad Blockers Are on the Rise

Episode 1277

Use of ad blockers is on the rise, lending many who rely on browser ads to complain. And it raises the question ... who owns your browser and the media that comes to you? Leo says he understands while viewers want to avoid ads they don't care about while surfing, but as someone who makes a living by providing ad supported content, he is also understanding on of the impact of blocking the ads, it costs him money. It's a fine line to tow. Should users be allowed to block ads? Some believe they shouldn't.

Intuit Sells Quicken

Episode 1267

A private equity firm bought Quicken from Intuit and promises to update it. Quicken is 33 years old, and balancing checkbooks is one of the first things people did with their computers. Intuit had been trying to sell the Quicken division since August. Quickbooks and Turbotax are more profitable because they have cloud services as well. But the Quicken desktop app hasn't been doing as well for Intuit.

Could Apple's Fight with FBI be Mostly PR?

Episode 1266

Apple has filed its response to the Department of Justice on the FBI's demand to unlock the San Bernardino shooter's iPhone. Nilay Patel, a professional attorney and founder of The Verge, says Apple's response is more of a PR response than a legal one. Normally you'd give the strongest argument first and then give additional arguments, but Apple started with the easiest-to-understand argument first. Among the arguments Apple used is a free speech defense.