RAID

Multiple Smaller Drives are More Reliable than 1 Massive Hard Drive

Leo advises to buy multiple smaller hard drives over one extremely large hard drive. The bigger the size, the higher the error rate...which can be catastrophic in the worst case scenario. In any case, move away from old spinning drives to faster Solid-state Drives (SSD), where the cost per gigabyte is getting conveniently cheaper. You may have so much storage in the future that you could forget to discipline yourself on cleaning out files!

What's a good alternative to Drobo?

Synology 4-bay RAID

Episode 1541

Rick from Edmonton, Canada

Rick bought a Drobo 2, and it's a bit flakier than his gen 1 Drobo. If it gets jostled, it has to reboot and rebuild. He's concerned that it's a single point of failure and he'll lose his data. Leo says that Drobos are a RAID (called Beyond Raid) where if one drive fails, it rebuilds form the other drives. So it's not really a single point of failure. But if all the drives go bad, then he's in a world of hurt.

Can I get rid of the RAID feature in my bios?

BIOS

Episode 1476

John from West Palm Beach, FL

John bought an SSD from Intel a few years ago, and it installed a RAID program in the BIOS of his computer. Now he can't get rid of it. What can he do? Leo says he should just ignore it. Most modern BIOS / EFI support RAID, but it doesn't really take up any usable room. It's just a firmware feature, so he can ignore it. He shouldn't mess with his BIOS anyway.

How can I make my SSD faster and more secure?

Intel SSD

Episode 1470

Jake from Dallas, TX

Jake swapped out his smaller SSD with a larger one on his computer. Leo says that Jake could just keep that drive as his software only drive and then use the larger drive for data. He could even combine multiple drives into a RAID for redundancy. He should keep in mind that using RAID 0 may be fast, but it's also less reliable because if one drive fails, it all fails. RAID 1 would give him data security by making multiple copies of the same data. RAID 5 is what is common now, and that offers the best of both worlds.

Does Windows control my RAID?

Episode 1271

Dave from Crystal Lake, IL

Dave has gotten a notice that he will be upgraded to Windows 10 on a certain date unless he cancels it. So he did. Leo says that Microsoft is really pushing for users to upgrade to Windows 10, whether they want it or not, and less savvy computer users may find they've been upgraded without their notice. It's pretty nefarious. Users do need to agree to the EULA to use it, but that's after Microsoft has installed it and if you don't want Windows 10, you'll have to uninstall it.

What can I do if my Windows 10 install fails?

Episode 1211

Rob from Vacaville, CA

Rob got an invitation to upgrade to Windows 10, it died right in the middle of the upgrade, and now he can't do anything. He tried to revert to Windows 7 but it won't work. He's heard that his RAID may be the culprit. Leo says if he can boot to his Windows 7 DVD, he should be able to format and reinstall. Leo believes that Rob's RAID array or his hard drive has likely failed. So he may have to rebuild everything.

What's the best RAID to backup media programs on my network?

Episode 1118

Stan from San Francisco, CA

Stan wants to clear off his DVR with a 2 Bay RAID to save his programs. But his beef is that there isn't a lot of documentation. Leo says don't worry about all that. Just use the PC settings. You can also use a DROBO, which allows you to hot swap drives if they fail so you don't have to stop it from running. But two drives isn't best because it's mirroring and you will only get half the capacity since they're identical. Leo prefers RAID 5 with three drives which gives you 2/3 storage 1/3 redundancy. It's robust. Companies that make eSata RAID 5 include Drobo.