passwords

How to Set Up Two-Factor Authentication

Leo has talked a lot on the Tech Guy show about using two factor authentication wherever possible to ensure the security of your online accounts. Two factor authentication requires more than just a 1 factor to login. This could include two of the following: something you are (such as biometrics like fingerprints or iris scans), something you know (a password), or something you have (a smartphone or hardware key). This could be called many things, including “Two-Step Verification” and “Two-Factor Authentication” depending on the site.

Are YubiKeys accessible for the blind?

Episode 1433

Tom from New Hampshire
YubiKey

Tom wants to know where he can find a YubiKey, and whether or not it's accessible for the blind. Leo says they are accessible, and he can get it at yubico.com. This is a little USB device that plugs into a USB port, and the computer sees it as a keyboard. The YubiKey will light up, and then press the button on the key. Just make sure the cursor is in the correct field that it will need to fill, and it will fill in the password. This doesn't work for an iPhone, however, because it doesn't have a USB port.

Has my Google account been hacked?

Episode 1415

Burt from Porter Ranch, CA
Google

Burt has a Motorola Max mobile device and an iPad. He got a notification to update his security and contact list on his phone, but the iPad gave him a notification that his Google password had changed without his knowledge. Leo says that's worrisome. It sounds like someone may have hacked his Google account. Leo advises going to iCloud.com to see if he can log in. If he can, then his AppleID is likely secure. But Leo advises changing the password again to verify everything.

Log into Facebook with a One-Time Password

Using Facebook on a public computer, or even on a friend's computer, can be risky. Facebook stores a cookie in the browser that enables the user to get into the site without actually logging in. This would make it possible for someone else to easily gain access to your account. Instead of avoiding Facebook entirely, there is a way you can still use it and prevent someone else from being able to get in — by using a one-time password.

How can I remember all of my passwords?

Episode 1401

Andrea from Long Beach, CA
LastPass

Andrea's mother has problems remembering her passwords. What's the best way to do it? Leo says we all have a problem remembering them, and if it's easy to remember, there's a good chance it will be easily cracked. She'll want her password to be difficult, but by extension, that makes them difficult to remember. Writing them down isn't a bad idea as long as nobody has access to them. A password vault would be a good idea, where she would let the software generate all of her passwords and all she needs to remember is the master password.

Why can't I access my email?

Buzz from Huntington Beach, CA

Episode 1399

Buzz is having a problem with 2 factor authentication on Apple's Mail app. He is able to input his password, but it won't take it. Leo says that Apple should create an authenticator program that can be used to verify user identity that can then be texted to him. That way, he's protected. If he's having trouble with it, Apple is really the only one that can solve the issue. It may be that his password has been changed and he forgot.

Is my banking information safe?

Episode 1384

Mike from Granada Hills, CA
Google Chrome

Mike is worried that Google has all of his banking information. Leo says it's not to worry about. They don't have it. If anything, his browser has that information and that's much more dangerous. It may be a good idea to reset his browser to get rid of all that. Then turn on second factor authentication to make sure that any attempt to change his password or access his account will be stopped. Mike shouldn't worry about Google, though. They're quite secure, and Chrome is a secure browser.