LED

Can I fix my TV?

Samsung HD TV

Episode 1467

Joe from Victorville, CA

Joe has an issue with a thin black line that has suddenly appeared on his LCD. Leo says that means a row of pixels is dead and it's unfixable. It happened to Leo once on the air when he showed it on Live with Regis and Kelly. Generally, it's a physical hardware issue, and these things are made so thin, that he can't really get in and fix it. It will need to be replaced.

Does Samsung's QLED TVs use OLED technology?

Samsung QLED TV

Episode 1448

David from California

David is seeing "banding" when he's watching his HDTV. What is that? Leo says that banding usually indicates compression and comes from the source material. If he wants to test it, he should hook up his TV to a Blu-Ray player and play a Blu-ray DVD. He won't see any banding because there's no compression there. But when he watches on satellite or streaming Netflix, he'll see it because the signal is compressed.

Is my iMac worth repairing?

Apple iMac

Episode 1241

John from Savannah, GA

John bought an iMac in 2011 and lately it's starting to flicker, with half of the screen darker. He called Apple and they suggested clearing the PRAM. Leo says that's one of the magical 'voodoo' techniques in case something got corrupted like a driver or something. Then they had him do a factory reset. But it still is happening. John also heard that the video card may be going out. But more likely, Leo says that the backlit LED screen simply stopped working, and that can happen over time with an LCD. One way to test if it's the video card is to connect an external monitor to it.

Dick DeBartolo, The Giz Wiz

Dick DeBartolo

Episode 1229

This week's gadget is from SnapPower, which is an easy to install Night Light and USB charger. By taking out one little screw, you remove your existing plate and get a USB charger or LED guide lights. And there's no wiring. The tabs inside snap over the screws for the electric wires and they supply the power. It's pretty genius. It costs $15-20.

http://www.snappower.com/

Giz Wiz Video: https://youtu.be/7D1l501RKw0

If money were no object, what 60-65 inch LED TV would you get?

Sony X950B

Episode 1098

Roger from Torrance, CA

Scott says he would get the Sony X950B 4K TV. Roger says that one won't work for him. David adds in that if money were no object, he'd get an OLED TV, but that would be a curved screen. Scott says he might opt for the LG 77" for $30,000, but Roger apparently is at least a little price conscious. Scott thinks that at 77", a curved screen might be ok. LG's screens also are only slightly curved, not as curved as Samsung's displays. The Vizio Reference Series will be making a 65" display, and both Scott and David recommend waiting for that one.

What HD TV should I buy?

Episode 1086

Edgar from San Diego, CA

Edgar is also in the market for an HDTV. Leo likes Plasmas because they have the most cinematic look, but most manufacturers are getting out of plasmas because people are buying LCDs. LCD TVs have improved a lot over the past few years. Should he wait for UltraHD? Leo says we're starting to get more UHD content, so it won't be long before Leo will advise making the switch. It does look a lot better. But Leo says he's better off not buying a 4K TV right now. He should just get a very good 1080p with the knowledge he'll be going UHD in about 4-5 years.

Is the 80" Vizio TV a good product?

Vizio TV

Episode 1067

Olivier from Newport Coast, CA

Olivier is about to buy an 80" TV. He's trying to decide between two LED TVs, one is a Vizio. There's quite a price difference. Leo says that Vizio had made it's mark by offering high quality TVs for the money, and Leo says that it's good enough for the money. Leo says there is one flaw with any LED LCD: they're slow. Manufacturers have added frames to make up for this, which is why there are 120hz and 240hz options. The result is a plastic-like picture. So he should make sure to turn "interpolation" off in the settings.

Philips Announced New LED Lightbulb Without Heat Sink

Philips SlimStyle LED lightbulb

Episode 1048

Since the government has banned most sales of incandescent lightbulbs, newer technologies like CFL (Compact Fluorescent) and LED lights have taken its place. There are plenty of reasons not to like CFL, though. The light they produce is harsh, they contain Mercury so there are pollution issues, and they take time to "warm up" after being turned on. LED bulbs, on the other hand, take very little power and last for a very long time. The only issue with LED lightbulbs at this point is the heat they produce, requiring a large and expensive heat sink to be used.