internet security

Why can't I use Java in my browser?

URL

Episode 1543

Doug from Beaumont, CA

Doug likes to visit the Aviation Weather Service online, but he's been having trouble with it lately. Leo says that's because it uses Java and the Java browser plugin has probably been disabled. Doug should go into his browser settings and be sure it's installed, updated, and enabled. But it's getting harder to use Java in the browser. If he has Firefox version 52 or higher, or Chrome 42 or higher, or even Safari, the plugin would have been disabled for security reasons. So his only choice may be to use Internet Explorer for that site. He'll have to turn on scripting for Java apps.

How can I create secure Wi-Fi in my apartment building?

Ubiquity Edge Router X

Episode 1534

Scott from Colorado Springs, CO

Scott is looking for a secure internet solution for his apartment tenants. Leo says he'll want to have a business version, which will give him a more reliable and faster connection. Leo suggests buying four different routers in bridge mode with a main Ubiquity Edge Router X. That will enable you to route traffic through the other four routers via a VLan connection. They will have a secure and isolated connection, while still sharing the connection. The other option is to let your tenants secure their own internet connection.

How can I reactivate my Facebook account?

Facebook

Episode 1529

Tom from Carson, CA

Tom's wife hasn't been able to log into Facebook since last Friday. Leo says that last Friday Facebook logged over 90 million people out of their accounts due to a hack. Many were deactivated until they can prove it's their account. And with over 90 million compromised accounts, it could take awhile. When her account is reactivated, she will have to re-login manually, turn on 2 factor authentication, and it would be a good idea to change her password.

What's the best mesh router?

Plume Wi-Fi

Episode 1506

Paul from Louisville, KY

Paul is concerned about internet of things and security. He wants to know if Plume would be a good, secure mesh router that can protect his network from the outside hacking his IoT. Leo says that Plume requires a yearly subscription to keep it up to date. Leo says it's somewhat justified because it can keep his network more secure. He's paying for security on his network, but his IoT devices may not be getting updated, so they're not secure. And his internet is only as secure as his weakest device.

Why am I getting an insecure website warning?

Browser warning

Episode 1471

Kimberly from Carlsbad, CA

Kimberly is having issues with her U-Verse internet access after wiring her computer directly. She sees things on her browser she doesn't like. Her "IT guy" says it's an IP issue. Leo says someone is overthinking it. It's not an IP issue. IPv6 is invisible, so that shouldn't make a difference. Not all sites are secure, the only ones that are should be the ones she's giving private information to. And a log in form could be secure while a page is not. Yahoo isn't the greatest ISP to rely on, either.

Should I have to pay to have my router updated?

Netgear Nighthawk AC1900 router

Episode 1456

Mark from Northridge, CA

Mark got the Nighthawk router and now he's hearing he has to buy a service agreement to have it updated for security after owning it for 90 days. Leo says that's outrageous. Security updates should be included in a $200 router. Paying $129 a year is ridiculous. But we expect really cheap gear now and with a single tech call, they can lose their profit margin. It's just the nature of the technology business. Security is a basic need, though, and that should be factored in.

Is using your Facebook login for another website safe?

Facebook

Episode 1450

Joseph from New Jersey

Ivan wants to know what he's giving away when he logs into a site using his Facebook ID. Leo says that's called Single Sign-on, which makes it easier to sign in. Many services, including Google and Twitter also offer it as a convenience. It's a user verification system that doesn't require him to create an account, nor does it give them access to his account. But it gives Facebook, Google, and Twitter access to more information about where he visits. It's safe to use it, but if he's concerned, he can create a dummy account that he'll only use for that purpose.