home theater

Scott Wilkinson ... delayed

Scott Wilkinson

Episode 1608

Scott went to an Aerosmith concert and was amazed at the quality of the video projection. He also learned that if you pay enough for your ticket, you can sit on the stage, listen with a pair of in-ear monitors, and listen to either the house mix or Steven Tyler's monitor mix. You can also get a free iPod. Cost ... starting at $800. Leo says that's not surprising at all. Concert tickets are really expensive now, pricing out a lot of younger fans. 

Scott Wilkinson ... and the bad solution

Scott Wilkinson

Episode 1606

Scott Wilkinson recently did an article on how soundbars have the design flaw of using only a single HDMI port. But what if you have multiple HDMI devices you want to connect? Scott was reviewing an LG Atmos Soundbar, when he discovered the drawback. Looking around, he discovered the same problem with other soundbars as well. Leo says you can use Optical, and that makes sense. But Scott says the optical output is limited and doesn't support Dolby Atmos. The only thing that carries the Atmos bitstream is HDMI.

Which Soundbar Should I Buy?

SB46514.

Episode 1604

Rick from San Diego, CA

Rick wants to get a 77" LG OLED TV for his home theatre. His problem is that he needs a soundbar system that supports Dolby Atmos at home, and must have wireless speakers. Scott says there are a variety of soundbars that will do what Rick needs, including one he's reviewing right now from LG (the SL8YG).  You can also buy a separate surround speaker package. But it's not cheap. Cost is $850 plus $200 for the wireless surround package. Vizio also makes a wireless soundbar system with up-firing Atmos speakers: Model SB46514.

 

Scott Wilkinson ...Light Fields

Scott Wilkinson

Episode 1602

Scott joins us to talk about how the Sony OLED TV won the great Value Electronics Shootout. He's written a great article about it here. Also, this week, Scott attended a monthly meeting of SMPTE, the Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers, about immersive technologies. Scott says that the talk was about how 3D is essentially simulated. How do you get an authentic holographic presentation? The current solution is through Light Fields.

Scott Wilkinson and the 2019 TV Shootout

Scott Wilkinson

Episode 1600

This year, Scott Wilkinson was MC at the annual Value Electronics TV Shootout in New York. The test was done using TVs own on board Netflix apps to keep everything even. There was even a blu-ray player which used a switcher to send the signal to each TV. Top contenders for 2019 included the LG C9 OLED, Samsung Q90R, Sony A9G OLED, and the Sony Z9F LED LCD TV. There was also the Sony X800 Pro Reference monitor used for comparison to see how close each TV came to it. All 4K, HDR. There eight professional color grading pros judging. 

Are expensive speaker cables better than regular cables?

Canare 4S11 Speaker Cables

Episode 1597

Tony from Bowie, MD

Tony wants to know if high-end Speaker Cables are worth the money. He spent $400 on some recently. Leo says HOLY COW. They also offer a "break in service." Is that worth the money? Leo says that cables don't need to be broken in, but the Speakers may. $400 for cables is pretty steep. There's no real way to measure if expensive gold cables are any better than lower cost cables. It's entirely subjective, whether you think it sounds better or not. But if it sounds better to you, then it is better. So, why not?

Scott Wilkinson ... super bright

Scott Wilkinson

Episode 1596

Scott says that Vizio has announced their 2019 lineup and he says that the TVs are very impressive. Vizio has been using Quantum Dot technology in their top of the line models for a few years, but this year, they have moved the technology down to the mid-range. And that's a good thing. In their top of the line Quantum PX, they have a peak brightness of 3000 NITS, which is super bright. Why so bright? Because of the high dynamic range. They need that brightness for "specular highlights" of tiny reflections. The Color Range has also been expanded.

Scott Wilkinson ... ARC

Scott

Episode 1592

Scott has a question from a user that wants to know how he can run his audio from the TV to his home theatre. He uses the TV's internal smart apps. Scott says that the audio return channel (ARC) that you want to use. This depends on his receiver. Current TVs have this capability. Take the HDMI out from the receiver to the ARC port. That way the sound will come out of the home theatre speakers.