haveIbeenpwned

How can I protect myself from identity theft?

ID Fraud

Episode 1559

Mara from Los Angeles, CA

Mara was a victim of identity theft, and just narrowly avoided having her brokerage account drained. Leo says that Mara should change her password and turn on 2 factor authentication right away. Leo suspects the bad guys got her information from a database breach like the Collection #1 or the Marriott hack. Leo also suggests going to haveIbeenpwned.com/passwords and see if her passwords have been compromised and are known.

Collection #1 Password Hacks Prove to be Older than Believed

Episode 1559

Yesterday's story about Collection #1 - a package of hacked email passwords, is actually now reported to be a few years old, so the damage is not as great as previously believed. But Leo still says that it's a wise idea to go to HaveIBeenPwned.com/passwords and see if your account has been hacked. And then change your password. In fact, it may be a good idea to change it anyway, and turn on 2 factor authentication while you're at it.

Find Out If Your Accounts Have Been Compromised

If you've seen a warning message or a popup online telling you that you've been hacked and that you need to take immediate action, chances are good that it's just a scam. These are nothing more than scare tactics designed to make you fall for something, whether it be giving your information or actually making a payment. But with all of the major security breaches happening, like the one at Marriott, there is some legitimate concern that your accounts could have been compromised. In other words, there is a chance you've been "pwned."

Have I been hacked?

Mouse

Episode 1552

George from Murrieta, GA

George got an email saying that his email account has been compromised, but it shows an old email. Leo says it's an old scam that is designed to scare him into sending the hackers money. If he's concerned, he should change his email password.

He can also go to HaveIBeenPwned.com to see if his email has been legitimately hacked. But changing the password will fix it. And while he's at it, he should turn on 2 Factor Authentication. He can simply ignore the extortion email, though.