email

How can I access my email anywhere?

Episode 1390

Steve from Mission Viejo, CA
Gmail

Steve would like to have access to his email from another device. Leo says he'll want to make sure his email client is set to IMAP, if his provider supports it. Then he can leave the email on the server when he reads it from his device. He should also make sure his port settings are properly configured. Leo also recommends setting up his own Gmail account, and then have it go get his email from Cox. Then he can have it on the Gmail server, which is accessible everywhere. It's also better for spam.

What's a good alternative to Outlook?

Episode 1383

Carlo from Irvine, CA
Gmail

Karlo has a cookie business, and when people order cookies and pay by Paypal, he has to use Outlook to get notifications. Leo says that Go Daddy's interface will support other email interfaces, regardless of what they may say. Outlook itself is a modern system and would work, but it's not the only game in town. He can also use Gmail. There's also Thunderbird, Windows Live Mail, and the Apple Mail app on Mac.

Why can't I log into my email?

Howard from Murrieta, CA

Episode 1382

Howard got a used computer from work and he's getting a popup when he checks into his email asking for his user name and password on Gmail. If he replies, it doesn't take it and he gets a note from Google someone has his password.

Leo says that two factor authentication could solve this, but he should clear out all his settings. There may be an Exchange server still attached for the email settings in Outlook. Leo also says to check his date and time. It's possible that the time and date is not accurate since it's an older computer and that's causing an issue.

Why is my email so poorly formatted?

Larry from Altadena, CA

Episode 1369

Larry has an android phone and sometimes he gets an email message that comes out vertically, rather than horizontally. Leo says that sounds like a bad html format. Leo suggests trying another Gmail app called Inbox. Leo likes it better anyway. If it's not happening there, then it's fixed. If it is, then look in your accessibility settings. It could also be so many indents from replying that it's causing bad formatting.

What mail program should I use on my Mac?

Episode 1366

Chris from Miami, FL
Apple Mail

Chris doesn't like the Mac Mail app, and PGP tends to screw things up. Leo has been making PGP keys since 2005, but when he made them, he didn't keep track of the revocation password or get a revocation certificate so he can't revoke old keys. It's always best to use the most recent key. The way to verify that encrypted email with Leo works is by going to his website at leolaporte.com and checking the PGP link, which is his most current key. PGP doesn't work with the updated macOS Sierra Mail app, though.

Is email secure enough for sending sensitive information?

Episode 1353

Vernon from Pennsylvania
Email on iPhone

Vernon was told by his insurance company that they would be sending him documents via email, and the first two times, he didn't receive it. The third time they sent it, it arrived. They told him the document was encrypted, but he could put anything in the password field to open it. He's now concerned that his personal information could be out in the wild.

If I opened an email I didn't know, could I be hacked?

Ann from Studio City, CA

Episode 1350

Ann got an email notification from Yahoo in her inbox. She had a hunch it was bogus but didn't do anything with it. Can she still get hacked if she opens it but doesn't click on any links? Leo says that a bad guy has to get her to run a program. Leo says that opening the email is relatively harmless, so long as she doesn't click on any links.

How can I tell a phony email from a legitimate one?

Michael from Newcastle, PA

Episode 1347

Mike wants to know how to tell a real email from a phishing email. Leo says to hover over any link that would send him to a website, and see if the link is legitimate. He should never click on it. If it says to install something, or even asks for a credit card, don't do it. That's usually the first sign of an intent to do something nefarious.