adobe premiere elements

How can I burn a DVD?

DVDs

Episode 1494

Tom from Burbank, CA

Tom has made movies in iMovie and wants to burn them on DVD. Leo says that iMovie will encode his movie into .MOV, which is a wrapper for MP4. But when he burns a DVD, it creates a specific format called MPEG2, which is SD quality. iMovie used to have the capability to burn to DVDs, but Apple stripped it out. So he'll need a DVD burning program to do it. That program will also author the structure with menus, etc. Here are some options:

How can I edit my home movies?

Handbrake

Episode 1467

Richard from Los Angeles, CA

Richard has some old 8mm home movies that were transferred to DVD. They were transferred out of order and he wants to redo them, re-edit the video files, etc. Leo says that those DVDs are a treasure chest but he'll need to make sure he gets those videos off them and onto a hard drive, because sooner or later that DVD may not be playable. Is there something online that he can use? Leo says that video files are too big to upload to the cloud.

Why can't I burn DVDs anymore?

Episode 1228

Christine from San Diego, CA

Christine is having trouble burning DVDs via iDVD. Leo says that program hasn't been updated in years. Apple abandoned it, but many still use it. If Christine updated it, that could have broken the usability of it. It could also be a bad DVD blank. The bottom line is that the future is calling, and optical media isn't coming along with it. We're moving to the cloud. But for sharing movies with family members, a DVD is still a good idea.

What software can I use to render 60 fps video?

Adobe Premiere Elements

Episode 1191

Jack from New Hampshire

Jack is starting a Kickstarter page where he's selling his drone footage. He's having trouble rendering 1080p HD videos at 60 fps. Leo says it's the 60 fps that's catching him up. But 60 fps is the future. Leo says that it comes down to the computer, and the software should be able to handle 60fps. Adobe Premiere Elements should be able to, as does Sony Vegas.

What's good free video editing software?

Episode 1086

Josh from New York, NY

Josh doesn't care for Windows Movie Maker. Leo says that Windows Movie Maker has gotten a lot better over time, but in general, he'll get what he pays for.

Leo recommends a paid solution like Adobe Premiere Elements. There's also Sony Vegas. It's well worth the $80. But if all he needs to do is cut up video, he may want to try VideoLAN Movie Creator. There are other open source solutions, but they're finicky and difficult to learn. One open source option is Lightworks.