This Week in Tech News

Twitter & Facebook take stock hits

Episode 1509

Twitter banned a ton of fake accounts this quarter, and as a result, not only lost 1 million active users, but also saw their stock take a dump. Even though they made $20 million in the process. But Wall Street says that Twitter isn't growing, and as a result, the value declined. Even Facebook took a hit this week, in the single largest stock loss in Wall Street trading history. $120 Billion in lost value. Mark Zuckerberg lost over half his personal wealth. But Leo says he'll likely bounce back over time.

The MacBook Thermal Throttling Issue Is Over Blown

Episode 1509

Leo says that he's been using the new MacBook Pro for a week with Apple's firmware fix to solve the thermal throttling issue of its i9 processor during heavy use applications. Leo says it's now mighty fast and is running as it should. The problem as a simple missing piece of code called a digital key. Now everything is as it should be and the internet needs to stop piling on the new MacBook Pro.

How's Your Sleep in the Digital Age?

Episode 1508

Sleeping at desk

A recent study shows that with all the smartphone, tablets, and computer screens we have around us, the quality of our sleep has really started to decline. The number one suggestion? Put down that cellphone. The LED screens are keeping your brains awake.

One Week with the 2018 MacBook Pro

Episode 1507

Apple MacBook Pro

Leo has had the new MacBook Pro for a few days. He got a six core i9 processor, and frankly, it's not much different from the previous model. Apple didn't really change it much, except for a redesigned keyboard that has a silicone shield that can keep crumbs and dust out, which could render the keyboard inoperable. The downside is that it will be very difficult to repair, a $700 fix without Apple Care. Leo does say that the silicone barrier also makes the keys quieter and cushier.

Apple Refreshes MacBook Pro Line

Episode 1505

Apple announced a 13" and 15" refresh of the MacBook Pro, starting at $1799 and $2399. Leo says that all the Macs released in the last few years have been aimed at professionals, and he believes that the consumer grade Mac is on the way out. Apple really wants consumers to buy iPads, rather than laptops of iMacs. So in the near future, you may have to pay thousands to get that MacBook or iMac. You can get them with an i9 processor and up to 4TB hard drive. So expect to pay around $7,000 to be able to edit your film on your laptop.

Malware Convinces You That Your Machine Is Frozen

Episode 1505

There's a hack on some websites that will make you think that your computer has frozen and you won't be able to get it back unless you call an 800 number and pay money. Leo says it's nonsense phishing scam. Control At Delete or Force Quit the browser. Everything will get back to normal.

Apple Finally Admits Sticky Butterfly Keyboard Problem

Episode 1499

Apple MacBook Pro

Apple has finally acknowledged the ongoing issues that MacBook and MacBook Pro users have been having with sticky keys on their butterfly keyboard design. Faced with three separate class action lawsuits, Apple will fix or replace the keyboards on 2015-2017 laptops for free. And if you've already paid for the repair, Leo says that Apple will give you a full refund. Leo also says there comes a time when you just have to admit the problem, fix it, and move on, and about half of MacBook and MacBook Pro users are experiencing the problem, so Apple should redesign it.

We Now Know How the FBI Cracked the iPhone

Episode 1499

Apple iPhone X

Researchers have figured out that if you connect your iPhone to a computer, you can keep doing a brute force password attack to unlock it and that it should take about a day to open it. Leo says that this is with a four digit passcode, and a six digit passcode is a lot harder to crack.

The Supreme Court has also ruled that law enforcement cannot get cell phone location data without a warrant. The decision said that day to day movement data on a mobile device provides an intimate look at someone's activities, even to the point of violating privacy without a warrant.