Audience Questions

Audience QuestionsHour 1

Hour 1 Hour 2 Hour 3
Watch Dave from San Anselmo, CA Comments

Dave recently upgraded his network with new routers and created Steve Gibson's three router network for security. He wants to know what's the best way to do it to be more efficient and secure. Leo says that Steve Gibson over at GRC.com is the expert here. But there's an easier way to do it, with virtual LAN networks assigned within the physical network. Using the EdgeRouterX enables you to create up to 4 segmented networks that can't cross over. And it's only $59. Great deal. But since Dave has already bought the routers, PC Perspective is where you want to go. Here's a great article - https://pcper.com/2016/08/steve-gibsons-three-router-solution-to-iot-insecurity/

And here is a PDF of Steve's Three router setup - https://www.grc.com/sn/sn-545.pdf

Audience QuestionsHour 2

Hour 1 Hour 2 Hour 3
Watch Ross from Palm Springs, CA Comments

Ross' 96-year-old mother listens to Pandora at home and has heard that Jitterbug has a new smartphone. Leo says that it just came out and it promises to be the simplest smartphone ever. It's only $100, though, so it's not going to be that complex. It's been highly modified Android device with a special launcher that makes for big buttons that are easy to read. Can he put Pandora on it? Leo says that it's hard to tell by the specs. If they don't have an app store, then there's a challenge there. Leo says you need to ask them to find out.

From the chatroom - it may be possible according to this video - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X-Qv4ybQAbQ

Watch Ivan from West Covina, CA Comments

Ivan's granddaughter would like to capture the screen of an iPad and add visual commentary. Leo says she wants to be a youtube star! Leo says the iPad can't do both. It does have a built-in screen recorder. Then you can record her with a camera and then edit the two together on a computer with a picture in picture option. Another option is an open source program called OBS Studio that can do it in real time on a computer. It's mostly used in making screencasts.  

Watch John from Los Angeles, CA Comments

John records music on his laptop, but his software is crashing a lot. When it crashes, it compiles error data for a long time. Can he turn that off? Leo says that John has a 64GB of RAM and that can take a long time. You should be able to turn off the memory dump in the system and security under "advanced." Hit the Windows Key and type startup and recovery. Windows+X select system, advanced, startup, and recovery, then you can turn off the memory dump. Select NONE.  But Leo also says that if it's crashing, it could be that your drivers are corrupted. It may be a good idea to uninstall your recording software and then reinstall it. Update the drivers, as well, if you can. 

Or, you can use a different app. There are plenty of DAWS apps out there, some are open source. 

Audience QuestionsHour 3

Hour 1 Hour 2 Hour 3
Watch Chip from Corona Del Mar, CA Comments

Chip is building a computer and wants to add a new NAS to his Drobo. Leo says that Chip has a DAS, or Direct Attached Storage. So building a NAS would be different. But it's a great time to buy hard drives for it, as WD NAS drives are under $90 right now. DROBO isn't that great as a NAS, because of the software. But as a large drive or direct attached storage, it works. For a NAS, Leo's favorite is SYNOLOGY. He uses the five drive model for his network and then backs that up to the cloud. It also works as a server. Another is QNAP, but that's a bit more expensive. 

Watch Ken from Merced, CA Comments

Ken wants to know if he should make Cortana his personal assistant in Windows. Leo says no. It's more hassle than it's worth and Leo turns it off on all his Windows devices. It's really only worth turning on if the user actually uses it.  But it's a huge privacy leak because Windows sends data to Microsoft to make Cortana more useful -  LOTS of data. So Leo isn't a fan of that. 

Watch Chris from Long Beach CA Comments

Chris is having trouble loading his Windows profile as he logs into his Windows 7 computer. He worries he's been hacked. Leo says that more likely, it's a flakey hard drive that's preventing the data from being read. Windows 7 is now over 10 years old and if he hasn't changed that hard drive in that amount of time, it's likely a bad hard drive. Boot into safe mode and see if the profile can load. If he can, then he may just have a corrupt profile. In all likelihood though, it's a bad hard drive that's about to die. But Chris has another problem. This January, Windows 7 will go end of life and won't be supported. So he won't want to put that computer online after that.