Previous episode

Episode 1536 October 28, 2018

Next episode

Audience Questions

Audience QuestionsHour 1

Hour 1 Hour 2 Hour 3
Watch Ann from Irvine, CA Comments

When Ann is on the phone and gets another phone call, her iPhone is automatically putting her existing call on hold and picking up the next call. Leo says that shouldn't be happening. She should be given the choice of putting her call on hold, sending it to voicemail, or hanging up and taking the call. It's usually when she's using it on speaker phone. Leo says that it could be that Siri is being triggered, but it's unlikely. It could be a hardware glitch, but that's going to be difficult to replicate. Leo says that sometimes restarting the iPhone will clear everything out and it could prevent it from happening in the future. She could also reset the phone. But if it happens again, she should take it to the Apple Store.

Watch James from Tallahassee, FL Comments

James is looking for an app that will help him to edit the metadata that is in his still images. He wants one that will allow him to put in a description and then search for keywords. Leo says that all photos have extended information tags, or "EXIF" data. There's also a standard called IPTC that does titles and descriptions. So it can be done. Most photo library programs, like Adobe Lightroom will do it. There's a free one called Photo Me.

Another option is Fast RAW Viewer. He can try it before buying.

Watch Chris from Rhode Island Comments

Chris has an Android phone and he gets a popup that says Amazon has stopped working. Leo says it's probably an Amazon app that is running in the background, and is crashing. Leo recommends deleting and reinstalling his Amazon apps.

Watch Tom from Chicago, IL Comments

Tom has been trying to get his friends to put their emergency health information in their iPhone. Leo says it's called I.C.E., for In Case of Emergency. It allows first responders to access vital information from a mobile phone without having to unlock it. It's called Medical ID, which enables users to put in emergency contact information, blood type, and other medical data.

Tom's wondering how he can do this on Android, though. Leo says Samsung has an ICE feature. But he could also have an ICE message created on his lock screen image.

ScooterX says that there are ICE settings in Android phones using the two latest versions of Android. It's under "Emergency" in the phone settings. Users can enter similar details.

Audience QuestionsHour 2

Hour 1 Hour 2 Hour 3
Watch Ted from Camarillo, CA Comments

Ted has an article about virtual reality, where Cedar Sinai hospital is using VR to treat chronic pain. Is that legit? The software costs about $2,000, so he's not sure he wants to buy into it. Leo says that there is an article from the National Institutes of Health about the work being done studying how to use VR to treat pain. . Here's another from journals.plos.org.

Tom should also check out AppliedVR.io

It has to be better than risking an addiction to opioids. But Leo suspects that it's best to be used under medical supervision for the best results.

Watch David from Burbank, CA Comments

David has been asked if he can help do live streaming. Does he need Wi-Fi for that? Leo says not really, but he does need a cable long enough to go from where he's filming to a computer in order to stream it. If he uses multiple cameras, then he'll need a switcher to control them. It's always best to start with one camera and then expand as he needs to.

Video capture software to do the streaming depends on where he wants to stream. Facebook and YouTube both offer streaming for free. They also offer software to download.

Wirecast is a good cross-platform app for doing it as well. And an open source free option is OBS Studio.

There's also an all-in-one camera solution called Mevo, which will stream directly to Facebook or YouTube, and it will shoot in 4K, so he can use software to do different angles from the same master image. It will stream to LiveStream, Facebook Live, Periscope Live, and YouTube. It's a great solution.

Watch Gary from Rockford, IL Comments

Gary downloaded Linux and it seems to be stuck in the BIOS. He can't download Windows Update. Leo says that he can download multiple operating systems, but Windows can run into trouble when trying to dual boot from the GRUB Boot Manager. When uninstalling Linux, he may have run into issues of missing Grub boot features.

Gary will need to repair the master boot record, and he can do that in Windows. He can get into the Windows Recovery menu by booting up and tapping F8. Then he should look for BootRec.exe to repair it. This article from neosmart.net can help.

Watch Sean from Carlsbad, CA Comments

Sean has four hard drives on his computer. He then removed all the bloatware by reinstalling Windows. But now he has a full SSD and wants to know how to migrate all his settings, bookmarks, temp files, etc. to a larger drive. How can he do that? Leo says it's nontrivial to do this. The key is to make a perfect copy of his home directory. The problem is his Windows Registry. He can't just move that over. Settings for programs and logins are stored there, and he will lose those.

Sean can try the Windows Migration Assistant. He can also make a clone of the drive, but he'll want to be sure it doesn't create a 60GB partition on his 2TB drive. EaseUS will do it.

Windows Backup is a disk imaging app that will allow him to make a disc image and then restore it to the larger drive. It's built into Windows. Other imaging options include:

  • Clonezilla
  • EaseUS
  • Drive Snapshot
  • Macrium
  • DriveImageXML
  • Terabyte Drive Image
  • Laplink PC Mover Express is a $45 program, and Laplink is very experienced in this.

    Audience QuestionsHour 3

    Hour 1 Hour 2 Hour 3
    Watch John from Uttica, NY Comments

    John has an old Android phone running Lollipop, and he has 45 characters the If the phone is lost menu to add more information including emergency contact information. It appears on the lock screen.

    Watch Mark from Los Angeles, CA Comments

    Mark wants to use his Android phone as a hotspot. Leo says that it's under the Internet settings under "Hotspot and Tethering." His phone carrier must support it, usually for an extra charge. But he's having issues using any security with a password. Leo says that's not good. It shouldn't be disabled. Leo wonders if that phone doesn't support WPA2. None is not a good choice. If there's WEP, that wouldn't be great, but it's better than nothing. But he'll ideally want WPA2 with PSK (pre shared key).

    Watch Mark from Los Angeles, CA Comments

    Mark wants to use his Android phone as a hotspot. Leo says that it's under the Internet settings under "Hotspot and Tethering." And his phone carrier must support it, usually for an extra charge. But he's having issues using any security with a password. Leo says that's not good. It shouldn't be disabled. Leo wonders if that phone doesn't support WPA2. None is not a good choice. If there's WEP, that wouldn't be great, but it's better than nothing. He'll ideally want WPA2 with PSK (pre shared key).

    Watch Fred from New York Comments

    Fred is legally blind, but he knows of a new app by Microsoft called Seeing AI. It offers text reading, barcode scanning, it will tell you if your light is on. It basically narrates the world around you. Currently only available, quite ironically, on all Apple devices.

    Leo says another option is called Be My Eyes. It works on Android.

    Watch Simon from Yorktown, VA Comments

    Simon recently encountered the dreaded Blue Screen of Death. He suspected it may be his Chrome browser. Could it be? Leo says that modern versions of Windows don't really allow a program to call a BSOD these days. The operating system protects against it. But it could be a bad driver. Flakey hardware like a power supply or loose RAM can also cause it. But Chrome doesn't have system access to cause a BSOD. If he can replicate it, that could lead him toward the culprit. If it's crashing right away, that's usually a hardware issue.

    How about booting into safe mode? If he can do that, then it's definitely a driver issue, and it's almost always a bad video driver. He should download the latest drivers for his computer, then reinstall them. While in safe mode, he can type "Recovery" and then he can run Windows 10 recovery to fix it. He can choose to "reset this PC" and "keep my files," and it will refresh the system. Worst case scenario, he can wipe the drive and start over.