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Episode 1224 September 27, 2015

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Audience Questions

Audience QuestionsHour 1

Hour 1 Hour 2 Hour 3
Watch Thomas from Stanford, CA Comments

Thomas bought a new iPhone 6s, his first as he leaves the Windows Phone behind. Leo says it's too bad, because the Windows phone was nice, but it just came too late to the party. Thomas is partially blind and he's had to move to the iPhone because the accessibility features are so much better. Leo says that Apple has done a great job with accessibility.

Thomas would like to edit video on the iPad by importing clips, cutting them, and then exporting them. Leo says that the iPad is oversimplified in that there's no real file system. Each app is "sandboxed," so few files are available from one app to another, and where it's possible, it's really ungainly. Thomas can try Wi-Fi syncing, but he'd still need to use iTunes to do it. Another option is to put data on DropBox or Microsoft's OneDrive and then open it with iMovie.

Watch Che from Orlando, FL Comments

Che just bought a new Dell XPS Desktop and it's started to slow down drastically. He does a speed test, like Leo taught, and the desktop is much slower than his laptop. Leo says to try plugging the desktop directly into the router with an ethernet cable, and see if the speed improves. If so, then he's narrowed it down to the router. Leo says it could the hardware, but he could try reinstalling the Wi-Fi connection. There may also be conflicting Wi-Fi drivers at work between the hardware driver and the Windows driver. That can confuse Windows and slow things down. Another issue is that the computer may be "promiscuous" with trying to join other Wi-Fi signals.

Watch Carlos from Hemet, CA Comments

In the early days of email, the internet service provider didn't want to be storing emails on their servers. They wanted you to log on, get your email, and then they would delete it. This is what Carlos is currently doing with Outlook. He's getting on the server, downloading the email, and deleting it from the server. It's an email protocol called POP. Carlos can continue to use POP if he wants, but in Outlook's settings he should change it to not delete the email from the server. That will leave the email on the server. This isn't the best way to do this, however.

The more modern email protocol is IMAP. This leaves the official copy of the email on the server. Unless you delete it from there, it will stay on the server. You can create folders, labels, etc on the server. Then the IMAP client will just read that information from the server and will even show the folders and labels you've created. This means that every message is available to every device, and changes made on one device will change them on your other devices as well. Google offers IMAP for free, but there are other companies like Fastmail that have this too.

Watch Bob from Michigan Comments

Bob has been trying to digitize his old VHS home movies and he's getting some jitter. Leo says that it could be that his computer isn't powerful enough, but it could also be the device he's using to capture the video. External USB 2 devices aren't as fast, especially for higher quality video. And it'll compress it greatly.

The bottom line is that he needs a faster USB 3 device to handle the workload. He can get an internal card for it. If his computer already has a USB 3 port, or even Thunderbolt, that would be better. He should upgrade his device to USB 3 and he'll be good to go. Hauppauge is a good place to start, as is Pinnacle/Grass Valley.

Watch Larry from Irvine, CA Comments

Larry wants to help a friend using his mobile phone, but he has iOS and his friend uses Android. Leo says the good news is that they're both computers. It'll be similar, but he'll have to spend a little time getting the lay of the land to learn the unique ins and outs of Android. But it's all minor stuff. The really good news is that the issues that Larry's friend has is with setting appointments and reminders, and going through Google makes it really easy. He'll just enter his Google credentials once and Google will take care of the rest. At the end of the day, the arguments of iPhone and Android are largely preferential.

Watch David from Los Angeles, CA Comments

David is wondering whether he should get the iPad Pro when it comes out, or get the Microsoft Surface Pro. We don't really know anything about the iPad Pro quite yet. Leo's impressed by it, but it comes down to whether or not software will take advantage of it. Since David will be using it for business, office work, and multitasking, Leo recommends sticking with the Microsoft Surface Pro. The Surface Pro 3 is good, and the Surface Pro 4, which should be out soon, will be even better.

Audience QuestionsHour 2

Hour 1 Hour 2 Hour 3
Watch Caesar from Los Angeles, CA Comments

Caesar is looking to create a low power radio station. Leo says the first thing to do is make sure he's operating legally. He should check the FCC website about operating a low power, unlicensed radio station. The FCC allows them, but only under certain conditions. Then, he can turn his attention to hardware.

A great website for learning about transmitters is Transmitter.org. It has a directory of low power transmitters in the Low Power FM section. Ramsey is one of the companies that focuses on them.

Watch Frank from Vancouver, WA Comments

Frank says that editing his videos is taking forever to render, so he's looking at a new Dell XPS computer. Will it matter? Leo says absolutely. More RAM will also help. A graphics card with a good GPU helps as well. The GPU is always the bottle neck and these days, modern computer software tries to harness the graphics processor to handle all the heavy lifting.

Frank should check out PCPerspectives for the best combination for video editing. The GTX750 is what they recommend.

Audience QuestionsHour 3

Hour 1 Hour 2 Hour 3
Watch Dave from Florida Comments

Dave has files that he shares on OneDrive for Business that are also linked to Sharepoint, but that account isn't available anymore. Leo says the problem is that OneDrive is looking for the link because it's still enabled in OneDrive. Dave will need to go into the OneDrive settings and disable that link.

Here's a technote from Microsoft that will tell how he can stop syncing his libraries to another location. It's not exactly obvious.

Watch G. Scott from California Comments

G Scott bought a Sony Vaio about a year ago, and he's been getting random shut downs. Leo says it sounds like a heat issue. Computers will shut down as a safety measure when a processor begins overheating. The fan has stopped running. G. Scott should go to CPUID.com and download a motherboard monitor to keep an eye on it.

On eBay, he can also buy a USB laptop fan that can blow air over the bottom of a laptop to keep it cooler, since laptops are notorious for generating a lot of heat. He should also check for dust or blockages. The thermal paste on the processor could dry out and separate from the heat sink and that could cause overheating as well.

Watch Jeff from Indiana Comments

Jeff has an older HP Pavilion laptop. He bought a new copy of Windows 10 Pro and installed it, but he's had an issue with the video display extending to his second monitor. It won't work. Leo says that he has a hunch fixes like this will be addressed with the service pack 1 update next month. Leo has always said that you shouldn't upgrade to Windows 10 unless you know your computer is compatible, and Microsoft won't offer it until that compatibility is in place. The fix will be coming, and it may already be there under his computer manufacturer's support site. But it's also possible that it may not be compatible at all. Leo advises being patient, and waiting until Microsoft says the computer is ready.

The chatroom also advises pressing WindowsKey + P, and selecting the PC screen extend option. There's a technote on how to do it at tech-recipes.com.

Watch Noah from Wyoming Comments

Noah just got a new Samsung Galaxy Note 3 Android phone and the emoji's are "disgustingly ugly." Leo says that yes, Samsung's emoji's are ugly and the problem is that there is no standard or specification of how they are drawn. Noah can check out iEmoji.com to see how they look from platform to platform. There's also EmojiPedia.org. And everyone has their own look.

Can he replace them? Leo says he can, but he may have to root his phone to do it. Leo says to be careful about that because while apps promise this, they may have side effects that break something, and some may be malware.

Another way he can get different emojis is by using a third party text program like Textra, which would allow him to use iOS Emojis.

Watch Dean from Northern California Comments

Dean is helping a disabled person with some technology and he needs a good large screen that can help him text and find things. Leo says that a smartphone allows users to do a lot of things, and the iPhone's accessibility settings are the best. Leo recommends going with the iPhone 6s Plus for the larger screen.

Watch Jim from North Hollywood, CA Comments

Jim has an HP OfficeJet 6700 printer and he's having trouble printing in color now that he's upgraded to Yosemite. Leo says that HP probably has an updated driver for it. He should click on the drivers button at HP.com and it'll give him the drivers for his OS X version. He should just be sure he gets the driver that's compatible with OS X Yosemite. It's up to the manufacturers, especially with older hardware, to update the drivers and sometimes a software update will simply break connectivity.

Watch Mary from Newport Beach, CA Comments

Mary would like to get a laptop that has the capability to burn a CD. Do they make them anymore? Leo says that she's probably not going to get an ultrabook for it. She will probably have to get an external drive that plugs in via USB. She could buy a larger laptop, a desktop replacement to do it, but they're heavy. She's not going to use that drive very often, so why not just buy a lighter, thinner laptop and buy an external optical drive for when she needs it? Leo also advises considering a Chromebook. They're cheaper, more secure, and all too often people buy computers that are just too powerful for their needs.