Audience Questions

Audience QuestionsHour 1

Hour 1 Hour 2 Hour 3
Watch Phillip from Realto, CA Comments

Phillip says his Internet Explorer stalls on him. Does he have to reformat and reinstall Windows? Leo says no. He can just reset Internet Explorer. Phillip should go into Tools > Internet Options > Advanced options > Reset. This will wipe out everything - including all the cached stuff - and reset it to the default configuration.

If that doesn't resolve the issue, Phillip can run the Windows Installer and select "Repair." Leo also says Phil can run the Windows System File Checker from the command line by typing "sfc /scannow." That will replace any damaged system files. Another thing he can run is the Windows Malicious Software Removal Tool (mrt.exe) by clicking Start > Run, and typing "mrt.exe." Then he should choose to do a full scan.

It may be that Phil has a browser hijack tool that's causing the issue. Leo suggests updating Internet Explorer, and running it without any extensions. To do that, he can go to Start > Run, and type "iexplore.exe -extoff"

Lastly, Phil could just use Google Chrome instead.

Watch John from San Diego, CA Comments

John is frustrated with the slow speed of his wireless connection. Leo says it largely depends on the speed. 802.11n is the fastest, but it's being supplanted by 80211.ac. John has an 802.11g router and that's not as fast as n. The farther away a router is, the slower the Wi-Fi signal gets. Congestion by competing Wi-Fi access points can be an issue as well, since everyone is on the same spectrum - 2.4Ghz. That's why Leo recommends using dual band routers which also run on the 5Ghz band spectrum.

Leo also recommends a Wi-Fi analyzer like NetStumbler or InSSIDER, which will provide him with a breakdown of all the competing wireless signals. Then again, it may just be time to get a new router.

John is also getting slow speeds via USB 3. Leo says that USB3 should give John up to 625MB per second, but it depends on the connection. A chain is only as strong as it's weakest link, and if the drive is a spinning drive, USB 3.0 will capable of faster speeds than it can produce. Unless it's a USB 3.0 hard drive, and even then, it could be that the USB 3.0 spinning hard drive just isn't that fast. Bus powered hard drives tend to be slower also. It's also important that he's using USB 3.0 cables. It really needs to be USB 3.0 compatible from start to finish.

Audience QuestionsHour 2

Hour 1 Hour 2 Hour 3
Watch Brad from Victorville, CA Comments

Brad is moving to a Panasonic GH4 camera, which he will shoot in 4K and then downgrade to 1080p. He's planning on getting a Mac Pro. Leo says that's what the Mac Pro is designed for 4K. Leo says it's an amazing machine. But Brad is worried because Leo's Mac Pro wasn't all that great and he wasn't happy with it. Leo says that's largely because he got one of the first ones and they had a few bugs, but Apple has ironed out most of those. People shouldn't get the first of anything, but because of Leo's job, he has to. Not to worry, Leo says it's a great machine that's very quiet and never gets hot. In fact, the spinning hard drive next to it that Leo uses for backup is louder than the Mac Pro! It's a great machine. If he can wait until next year, that may be the best option because all of the bugs should be have been dealt with by then.

Watch Judy from Seal Beach, CA Comments

Judy wants to know if she can buy her own DVR and use it with the same cable connection as the rest of the apartment. Leo says she could get a TIVO or a ChannelMaster that would do this, but since it won't have its own cable card from the cable company, it would need to connect to the set top box that's already there. This means she'll need an IR blaster so that the DVR can communicate to the cable box to change channels at the appropriate times. Some set top boxes have a link cable that the TIVO would understand, so she could hook it up that way. It would be better if she just paid to get another DVR installed.

Watch Ralph from Clairmont, CA Comments

Ralph creates 3D characters and then carves them out of foam for Disney. He's employing the same technology and starting a new business where he uses a cat scanner and laser 3D scanner, then 3D prints it to create accurate miniature dinosaur skulls that he casts in precious metals. Check out Ralph's Kickstarter campaign. Leo says it's a shameless plug, but he loves it and has to have one.

Audience QuestionsHour 3

Hour 1 Hour 2 Hour 3
Watch Marie from Whittier, CA Comments

Marie got the FBI Virus Scam popup that has locked up her computer. Leo says it's highly customizable by the hacker who sends it out and in Marie's case, it demands she call to address the issue. So Leo thinks that it may be an offshoot of the cyrpto locker virus. Or just a malicious website. Regardless, her system has been compromised. The only real way to handle it is to backup her data, wipe the drive and reinstall Windows from a known, good source. She can also run the system restore discs, then update the OS completely. After that, there are a few things she can do to prevent it from happening again:

1. Stop using Windows as an administrator. Use it as a limited user instead. Add an account as an administrator and then demote your existing account to limited user. This will stop over 90% of all the exploits out there.
2. Stop using Internet Explorer. Go with Google Chrome. It's free and far more secure. You also have to be sure it's up to date as well.
3. Don't click on links in email.
4. Only get your software from original vendors. Update Flash, Adobe Reader, etc. as well.
5. Keep your anti virus software up to date.
6. Stop using Java, you probably don't need it. But if you specifically do, make sure it's updated as well.
7. Use a password manager like LastPass to generate long, random passwords and keep track of them. And you only need to remember one password, the last pass password!

Watch Debbie from Pennsylvania Comments

Debbie is looking to cut the cord and cancel her satellite service. Leo says that the good news is most of the programming on TV, except live TV, is available over the Internet through Netflix, Hulu, Amazon Prime, Vudu, etc. With all that, who needs satellite or cable? Debbie wants to know how she can get that content from the internet on her TV. Leo says that there's the Roku 3, Apple TV, Amazon Fire TV. They hook to the Internet via Wi-Fi or wire, and then she can use that access her programming.

She won't be able to get live TV with that. If she can put up an antenna and is within line of site of the stations, she'll get even better HD TV since broadcast signal is uncompressed. She also won't get paid services like HBO, unfortunately. But the day is coming when HBO will bypass the cable companies and offer their content directly. Will she be able to get her content off the DVR that she has now? Leo says not really. There's no way to move it off because it's encrypted. She could exploit the "analog hole" and record via VCR. But that's going to be analog.

Watch Debbie from Redding, PA Comments

Debbie also has an old XP computer and wants to know if she can install Linux on it. Leo says that Debbie can, but she can also run on XP if she uses these steps:

1. Stop using Windows as an administrator. Use it as a limited user instead. Add an account as an administrator and then demote your existing account to limited user. This will stop over 90% of all the exploits out there.
2. Stop using Internet Explorer. Go with Google Chrome. It's free and far more secure. You also have to be sure it's up to date as well.
3. Don't click on links in email.
4. Only get your software from original vendors. Update Flash, Adobe Reader, etc. as well.
5. Keep your anti virus software up to date.
6. Stop using Java, you probably don't need it. But if you specifically do, make sure it's updated as well.
7. Use a password manager like LastPass to generate long, random passwords and keep track of them. And you only need to remember one password, the last pass password!

If she does these things, she'll be fine moving forward.

If she runs Linux, will she be able to print? Leo says in all likelihood yes. She'll just have to find the drivers for it. She can Google the model of the printer and "Ubuntu" and Debbie should find what she needs. But it's not for the faint of heart. Linux is an enthusiast product and the casual user may end up pulling their hair out.

Watch David from Reseda, CA Comments

David would like to use a URL shortener when he tweets. How can he do that? Leo says that Twitter usually does it automatically. But if not, Leo advises using Bit.ly. Then he can input the URL and add it. He can also customize it.

However, the disadvantage is that it's not apparent where the link leads to, which can be risky.