The Tech Guy Blog

Troubleshoot iOS Device Problems with These Steps

If you are having odd problems with your iOS device, there are some basic steps you can take first that might resolve the issue. First is to simply reboot the iPhone by holding down the power button and then "slide to power off." Then hold the power button again until it starts up with the Apple logo.

Next you can try a hard reset. You can do this by holding down the on/off button and the home button until the Apple logo appears.

Back Up Your Photos to the Cloud

Your photos are likely the most valuable and irreplaceable things on your smartphone. This is why it's essential to have a solid backup in case something goes wrong, or you lose your phone. You can always just connect the phone to your computer and drag the files over, but this requires that you remember to do it frequently. It's even better if it happens automatically, and fortunately there are several places you can backup to in the cloud:

Best of 2016

With the new year upon us, The Tech Guy show will not be live this weekend. Instead, we have put together a show of the biggest news stories and best calls and guest appearances from 2016. You can listen or watch at twit.tv/ttg/1351. Leo Laporte will be back taking your calls next weekend with the first live shows of 2017 on January 7 and 8 from 11am to 2pm Pacific Time. As always, the number to call will be 88-88-ASK-LEO (888-827-5536).

Create a New User in Windows 10

If you're having issues with your computer running slow, or you're getting frequent errors, it could be an issue isolated to your user account. This is especially true if you're noticing that it's taking a long time to simply log in. Creating a new, fresh user could resolve those problems and improve performance. Windows 10, however, makes it more difficult to do this with its new Control Panel. Here's what you'll need to do to create a new user on Windows 10:

Read Mac Formatted Drives with Windows

When you plug a drive that's been formatted for Mac into a Windows PC, you may find that it isn't readable. This is because Mac uses the HFS+ format natively, whereas Windows uses ExFAT or NTFS. One simple way to make the drive readable on both platforms is to format it to ExFAT, which both operating systems can understand. This will erase all contents on the disk, however, so you'll need to transfer those files to a safe place first.

If you can't reformat the drive, there are programs available that will make it possible to read a HFS+ drive on a PC:

Secure Your Wireless Network

After the DDoS attack over the weekend that brought down many major websites on the net, it's a good idea to check your own router and make sure that it's as secure as it can be. These Denial of Service attacks rely on 'bot nets' that are actually made up of unsecure computers on unsecured networks all over the world. Here are some basic steps you can take to make sure your network is protected:

Free Up Space on an Android Device

There are many inexpensive, or even free, Android phones being offered by carriers that may seem too good to turn down. Unfortunately, they may be too good to be true, though. Some of these phones are crippled with very limited internal storage space, and they may not even have an SD card slot for expansion. It's also important to remember that the actual usable space on the device will be less than what is advertised, because the operating system itself takes up space.

Access Devices on Your Home Network Without a Static IP

If you have a device on your network, such as a security camera or even a server that you want to access remotely, this can be difficult without a static IP address. An IP address is a number assigned to each device on a network that uses the internet. For most home users with residential internet service, this number can change periodically. When that number changes, it is referred to as a Dynamic IP address. It's possible, however, to pay more to get a Static IP address, which doesn't change. When the address is static, it's much easier to access devices and servers remotely.

Prevent Windows From Rearranging Your Desktop Icons

For many users, the Windows desktop is a quick and easy way to get to frequently used files and applications. Sometimes, however, Windows will rearrange all of your icons on its own. This can happen if you plug in another display or play a game that changes the display resolution. In some cases, just logging out or restarting the PC could rearrange the icons. There are a couple of things you can do to prevent this from happening in the future, though.